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The Mangbaerye Examinations: Ming Loyalist Court Rituals and Royal Authority in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Chosŏn

The Mangbaerye Examinations: Ming Loyalist Court Rituals and Royal Authority in Eighteenth- and... During the reigns of Yŏngjo (r. 1724–76) and Chŏngjo (r. 1776–1800), royal audiences and tests were established as important components of the mangbaerye-day events. For the two rulers, the audience was an occasion to use the significance of the rituals to justify bureaucratic promotions for the attendees. The literary and military tests on mangbaerye days were systematized by Yŏngjo and administered by the ruler as a stage in the state examination. By assuming leading ideological roles through rituals, Yŏngjo was able to present the image of a sage-ruler with supreme political and ideological authority. Chŏngjo refrained from bestowing examination privileges in the mangbaerye tests, making the mangbaerye days special occasions for disseminating Ming loyalism. In the nineteenth century, the frequency of Ming loyalist rituals was significantly reduced, and royal audiences came to a complete halt. Moreover, the rituals incrementally lost ground as events for highlighting the importance of the ritual attendees. The mangbaerye-day tests in the nineteenth century served as a venue to promote participating families’ political advancement, rather than as an occasion to bolster the monarchical authority and power. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Korean Studies Duke University Press

The Mangbaerye Examinations: Ming Loyalist Court Rituals and Royal Authority in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Chosŏn

Journal of Korean Studies , Volume 27 (1) – Mar 1, 2022

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Copyright
Copyright © 2022 Journal of Korean Studies Inc.
ISSN
0731-1613
eISSN
2158-1665
DOI
10.1215/07311613-9474266
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

During the reigns of Yŏngjo (r. 1724–76) and Chŏngjo (r. 1776–1800), royal audiences and tests were established as important components of the mangbaerye-day events. For the two rulers, the audience was an occasion to use the significance of the rituals to justify bureaucratic promotions for the attendees. The literary and military tests on mangbaerye days were systematized by Yŏngjo and administered by the ruler as a stage in the state examination. By assuming leading ideological roles through rituals, Yŏngjo was able to present the image of a sage-ruler with supreme political and ideological authority. Chŏngjo refrained from bestowing examination privileges in the mangbaerye tests, making the mangbaerye days special occasions for disseminating Ming loyalism. In the nineteenth century, the frequency of Ming loyalist rituals was significantly reduced, and royal audiences came to a complete halt. Moreover, the rituals incrementally lost ground as events for highlighting the importance of the ritual attendees. The mangbaerye-day tests in the nineteenth century served as a venue to promote participating families’ political advancement, rather than as an occasion to bolster the monarchical authority and power.

Journal

Journal of Korean StudiesDuke University Press

Published: Mar 1, 2022

References