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The Lord of Heaven versus Jesus Christ: Christian Sectarian Violence in Late-Nineteenth-Century South China

The Lord of Heaven versus Jesus Christ: Christian Sectarian Violence in Late-Nineteenth-Century... Spring 2000 laboration with the rival lineage segments in Kuxi. Seeing the temporal advantages of associating themselves with either Christian mission the rival lineage segments made use of the political resources of missionaries in the intralineage conflicts. Lying between the missionaries and local Christians were the Baptist evangelists and Catholic catechists, who were not simply the propagators of the Baptist Christianity and Catholicism. They, in fact, operated as active political agents in merging intralineage disputes with Christian sectarian rivalries and reproducing the conditions and resources conducive to the outbreak of violence. Here, the central question is why the junior segment of the Li lineage identified itself with the American Baptist mission, whereas the senior segment of the same lineage joined the Catholic church.1 These diverse patterns of religious identification, of the ongoing conflicts between the rival lineage segments, and of the changing power relations will be the foci of discussion. The significance of this development lies in the fact that it enables us to reflect on the operation of external and internal mediating forces in the colonizing project in a remote corner of late imperial China. This case study highlights the transformation of two rival lineage segments into http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png positions asia critique Duke University Press

The Lord of Heaven versus Jesus Christ: Christian Sectarian Violence in Late-Nineteenth-Century South China

positions asia critique , Volume 8 (1) – Mar 1, 2000

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2000 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1067-9847
eISSN
1527-8271
DOI
10.1215/10679847-8-1-77
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Spring 2000 laboration with the rival lineage segments in Kuxi. Seeing the temporal advantages of associating themselves with either Christian mission the rival lineage segments made use of the political resources of missionaries in the intralineage conflicts. Lying between the missionaries and local Christians were the Baptist evangelists and Catholic catechists, who were not simply the propagators of the Baptist Christianity and Catholicism. They, in fact, operated as active political agents in merging intralineage disputes with Christian sectarian rivalries and reproducing the conditions and resources conducive to the outbreak of violence. Here, the central question is why the junior segment of the Li lineage identified itself with the American Baptist mission, whereas the senior segment of the same lineage joined the Catholic church.1 These diverse patterns of religious identification, of the ongoing conflicts between the rival lineage segments, and of the changing power relations will be the foci of discussion. The significance of this development lies in the fact that it enables us to reflect on the operation of external and internal mediating forces in the colonizing project in a remote corner of late imperial China. This case study highlights the transformation of two rival lineage segments into

Journal

positions asia critiqueDuke University Press

Published: Mar 1, 2000

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