Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Little Review “Ulysses,”

The Little Review “Ulysses,” COMMON KNOWLEDGE James Joyce, The Little Review "Ulysses," ed. Mark Gaipa, Sean Latham, and Robert Scholes (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2015), 455 pp. That much of Ulysses was first published in magazine format (in The Little Review, from March 1918 to December 1920) is one of the curiosities of its genesis. Before postal authorities prohibited its further publication, the book's first thirteen episodes and a considerable part of the fourteenth were there for the public to read, to praise, or to denigrate. John Quinn, the New York lawyer who defended the book against charges that it had violated the "Hicklin rule" on obscenity (and who quickly lost in court), had not wanted serial publication, believing that what could be presented in a single volume would prove less outrageous to moral vigilantes than would monthly provocations. From a legal standpoint, he was probably right. But from the standpoint of those interested in how the book grew in Joyce's mind during the last two and a half years of its development, its appearance in The Little Review is a gift. Published by Duke University Press Common Knowledge The editors of this volume believe that Joyce did not always http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Common Knowledge Duke University Press

The Little Review “Ulysses,”

Common Knowledge , Volume 22 (2) – May 1, 2016

The Little Review “Ulysses,”


COMMON KNOWLEDGE James Joyce, The Little Review "Ulysses," ed. Mark Gaipa, Sean Latham, and Robert Scholes (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2015), 455 pp. That much of Ulysses was first published in magazine format (in The Little Review, from March 1918 to December 1920) is one of the curiosities of its genesis. Before postal authorities prohibited its further publication, the book's first thirteen episodes and a considerable part of the fourteenth were there for the public to read, to praise, or to denigrate. John Quinn, the New York lawyer who defended the book against charges that it had violated the "Hicklin rule" on obscenity (and who quickly lost in court), had not wanted serial publication, believing that what could be presented in a single volume would prove less outrageous to moral vigilantes than would monthly provocations. From a legal standpoint, he was probably right. But from the standpoint of those interested in how the book grew in Joyce's mind during the last two and a half years of its development, its appearance in The Little Review is a gift. Published by Duke University Press Common Knowledge The editors of this volume believe that Joyce did not always know, with precision, how the book would be built. Might it, as the author imagined, become the sixteenth story in Dubliners? Or would the scene now known as "Telemachus" in Ulysses become an extension of A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man? Would Ulysses have seventeen or eighteen episodes? What synthesis of objective prose and internal meditation would become its narrative style? Gaipa, Latham, and Scholes assert that, while Joyce had the book's title in his mind from 1906 onward, the earliest drafts were not written until 1917. That would give him only four or five years to compose the book before its appearance in Paris on February 2, 1922. While censorship made further serial publication impossible after the fourteenth episode, Joyce...
Loading next page...
 
/lp/duke-university-press/the-little-review-ulysses-mKDWK1Mmkg
Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Duke Univ Press
ISSN
0961-754X
eISSN
1538-4578
DOI
10.1215/0961754X-3487908
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

COMMON KNOWLEDGE James Joyce, The Little Review "Ulysses," ed. Mark Gaipa, Sean Latham, and Robert Scholes (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2015), 455 pp. That much of Ulysses was first published in magazine format (in The Little Review, from March 1918 to December 1920) is one of the curiosities of its genesis. Before postal authorities prohibited its further publication, the book's first thirteen episodes and a considerable part of the fourteenth were there for the public to read, to praise, or to denigrate. John Quinn, the New York lawyer who defended the book against charges that it had violated the "Hicklin rule" on obscenity (and who quickly lost in court), had not wanted serial publication, believing that what could be presented in a single volume would prove less outrageous to moral vigilantes than would monthly provocations. From a legal standpoint, he was probably right. But from the standpoint of those interested in how the book grew in Joyce's mind during the last two and a half years of its development, its appearance in The Little Review is a gift. Published by Duke University Press Common Knowledge The editors of this volume believe that Joyce did not always

Journal

Common KnowledgeDuke University Press

Published: May 1, 2016

There are no references for this article.