Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Last Soul Singer in America: Al Green

The Last Soul Singer in America: Al Green The LIISI Soul Singer in Amerito: Al Green Alton B. Pollard, III The worlds within and without the Veil of Color are changing, and changing rapidly, but not at the same rate, not in the same way; and this must produce a peculiar wrenching of the soul.-WE.B. DuBois, The Souls of Black Folk On lbe Meaning ol Soul Soul is a many-nuanced term, ranging in breadth and scope from the metaphysics of philosophy to any number of theological referents. From Western antiquity, for instance, come the well -known Pythago­ rean and Platonic accounts which make of soul an intermediate between that which is sensible and that which is intelligible. The soul, so interpreted, engages in a lifelong struggle for the acquisition of truth and knowledge, always in contention with the physical (spatial-temporal) limitations of the human body. Accordingly, only after such time as the soul finds release from the body is knowledge to be ultimately found. Even earlier and equally significant ruminations on the soul are derived from the ancient cultures of Africa. These African projec­ tions, which found later expression in Upper and Lower Egypt, all share a view that the soul or Ba (Egypt) is an aspect http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Black Sacred Music Duke University Press

The Last Soul Singer in America: Al Green

Loading next page...
 
/lp/duke-university-press/the-last-soul-singer-in-america-al-green-oi9RwAY0eH
Copyright
Copyright © 1989 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1043-9455
eISSN
2640-9879
DOI
10.1215/10439455-3.2.85
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The LIISI Soul Singer in Amerito: Al Green Alton B. Pollard, III The worlds within and without the Veil of Color are changing, and changing rapidly, but not at the same rate, not in the same way; and this must produce a peculiar wrenching of the soul.-WE.B. DuBois, The Souls of Black Folk On lbe Meaning ol Soul Soul is a many-nuanced term, ranging in breadth and scope from the metaphysics of philosophy to any number of theological referents. From Western antiquity, for instance, come the well -known Pythago­ rean and Platonic accounts which make of soul an intermediate between that which is sensible and that which is intelligible. The soul, so interpreted, engages in a lifelong struggle for the acquisition of truth and knowledge, always in contention with the physical (spatial-temporal) limitations of the human body. Accordingly, only after such time as the soul finds release from the body is knowledge to be ultimately found. Even earlier and equally significant ruminations on the soul are derived from the ancient cultures of Africa. These African projec­ tions, which found later expression in Upper and Lower Egypt, all share a view that the soul or Ba (Egypt) is an aspect

Journal

Black Sacred MusicDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 1989

There are no references for this article.