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THE LARGE-SCALE FORMAL ROLE OF THE SOLO ENTRY THEME IN THE EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY CONCERTO

THE LARGE-SCALE FORMAL ROLE OF THE SOLO ENTRY THEME IN THE EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY CONCERTO Although we might balk at the clichés (“limpid pools”) and the stereotypes (the apparently weak female who winds up wearing the pants), Forman’s description falls firmly within “normal” discourse in writing about concertos. The hallmark of this tradition is the casting of the /tutti relationship as a dramatic confrontation comparable to those in Greek tragedy or in opera. It is a ew whose origins can be traced back to the eighteenth century. To quote Heinrich Koch: There is a passionate dialogue between the concerto player and the accompanying orchestra. He expresses his feelings to the orchestra, and it signals him through short interspersed phrases sometimes approval, sometimes acceptance of his expression . . . by a concerto I imagine something similar to the tragedy of the ancients, where the actor expressed his feelings not towards the pit, but to the chorus ([1793] 1983, 209). According to this ew, the relationship between and tutti, like that between the Greek chorus and the tragedian, is not agonistic; the chorus does not represent the forces that will destroy the protagonist. As a conservate eighteenth-century man of letters, Koch probably read Classical tragedy not as an external conflict between indidual and collecte, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Music Theory Duke University Press

THE LARGE-SCALE FORMAL ROLE OF THE SOLO ENTRY THEME IN THE EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY CONCERTO

Journal of Music Theory , Volume 44 (2) – Jan 1, 2000

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2000 by Yale University
ISSN
0022-2909
eISSN
1941-7497
DOI
10.1215/00222909-44-2-381
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Although we might balk at the clichés (“limpid pools”) and the stereotypes (the apparently weak female who winds up wearing the pants), Forman’s description falls firmly within “normal” discourse in writing about concertos. The hallmark of this tradition is the casting of the /tutti relationship as a dramatic confrontation comparable to those in Greek tragedy or in opera. It is a ew whose origins can be traced back to the eighteenth century. To quote Heinrich Koch: There is a passionate dialogue between the concerto player and the accompanying orchestra. He expresses his feelings to the orchestra, and it signals him through short interspersed phrases sometimes approval, sometimes acceptance of his expression . . . by a concerto I imagine something similar to the tragedy of the ancients, where the actor expressed his feelings not towards the pit, but to the chorus ([1793] 1983, 209). According to this ew, the relationship between and tutti, like that between the Greek chorus and the tragedian, is not agonistic; the chorus does not represent the forces that will destroy the protagonist. As a conservate eighteenth-century man of letters, Koch probably read Classical tragedy not as an external conflict between indidual and collecte,

Journal

Journal of Music TheoryDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2000

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