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The Extra-Capitalist Extreme

The Extra-Capitalist Extreme ALISSA G. KARL Figure 1: "This is killing me, probably quite literally." Making quicklime on BBC 2's Edwardian Farm (2010) erhaps contrary to Fredric Jameson's oft-cited remark that "it seems to be easier for us today to imagine the thoroughgoing deterioration of the earth and of nature P than the breakdown of late capitalism," plenty of cultural productions today seek to access a place beyond our contemporary economic realm of consumer comforts. The image above comes from a re-enactment of early twentieth-century agricultural quicklime produc­ tion on the 2010 historical reality television series Edwardian Farm, a show that invites view­ ers to ponder the hard, dangerous labor of bygone times and to anticipate the likely bodily harm of the cast.2 Here, cast member Peter wears laughably inadequate goggles, hood, and mitts to protect him from quicklime's dangerous fumes; the scene's and the entire series' anachronism is legible through and as the body's vulnerability to immanent harm, especially as Peter tells us that his task is "killing [him], possibly quite literally." In this and many other instances in both this series and the historical re-enactment genre more generally, to go back in time is to place the body in peril. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png English Language Notes Duke University Press

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Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Regents of the University of Colorado
ISSN
0013-8282
eISSN
2573-3575
DOI
10.1215/00138282-54.2.107
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ALISSA G. KARL Figure 1: "This is killing me, probably quite literally." Making quicklime on BBC 2's Edwardian Farm (2010) erhaps contrary to Fredric Jameson's oft-cited remark that "it seems to be easier for us today to imagine the thoroughgoing deterioration of the earth and of nature P than the breakdown of late capitalism," plenty of cultural productions today seek to access a place beyond our contemporary economic realm of consumer comforts. The image above comes from a re-enactment of early twentieth-century agricultural quicklime produc­ tion on the 2010 historical reality television series Edwardian Farm, a show that invites view­ ers to ponder the hard, dangerous labor of bygone times and to anticipate the likely bodily harm of the cast.2 Here, cast member Peter wears laughably inadequate goggles, hood, and mitts to protect him from quicklime's dangerous fumes; the scene's and the entire series' anachronism is legible through and as the body's vulnerability to immanent harm, especially as Peter tells us that his task is "killing [him], possibly quite literally." In this and many other instances in both this series and the historical re-enactment genre more generally, to go back in time is to place the body in peril.

Journal

English Language NotesDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 2016

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