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The Early Reception of Neapolitan Partimento Theory in France: A Survey

The Early Reception of Neapolitan Partimento Theory in France: A Survey The tradition of the Neapolitan school of composition (in which the partimento and its teaching techniques played a significant role) had a major influence on musical training in Paris from the second half of the eighteenth century through the first half of the nineteenth century. This article focuses first on some significant witnesses of this era (Fedele Fenaroli and Emanuele Imbimbo, who followed the school of Francesco Durante) and then on an interpretation of the traditionally nonverbal rules of partimenti proposed by François-Joseph Fétis. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Music Theory Duke University Press

The Early Reception of Neapolitan Partimento Theory in France: A Survey

Journal of Music Theory , Volume 51 (1) – Jan 1, 2007

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Duke University Press
ISSN
0022-2909
eISSN
1941-7497
DOI
10.1215/00222909-2008-025
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The tradition of the Neapolitan school of composition (in which the partimento and its teaching techniques played a significant role) had a major influence on musical training in Paris from the second half of the eighteenth century through the first half of the nineteenth century. This article focuses first on some significant witnesses of this era (Fedele Fenaroli and Emanuele Imbimbo, who followed the school of Francesco Durante) and then on an interpretation of the traditionally nonverbal rules of partimenti proposed by François-Joseph Fétis.

Journal

Journal of Music TheoryDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2007

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