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The Disease of Nationalism, the Empire of Hygiene

The Disease of Nationalism, the Empire of Hygiene positions 6:3 0 1998 by Duke University Press. In 1907, one year after the appearance of his first full-length novel, Hakai [Broken Commandment], Shimazaki Toson (1872- 1943), one of modern Japan’s most respected poets and novelists, published an account of the experiences that lay behind the writing of the work.’ In the passage, Toson describes how he began work on Broken Commandment when he was a schoolteacher in the rural village of Komoro, just as the Russo-Japanese War broke out. He recounts numerous visits to the Komoro depot to send off pupils and fellow teachers who were bound for the battlefield. H e goes on: In my far-off mountain home, I heard about the plans of my friends in the city to observe the war, and I too decided to pick u p my pen and follow along with the troops-although in the end that wish went unfulfilled. It was then that I began work on the Broken Commandment manuscript. Life is a battleground, and an author is nothing but its war correspondent: thinking this way, I comforted myself with the thought that I, writing my novel, and my friends, on the far-off plains of Manchuria, were engaged http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png positions asia critique Duke University Press

The Disease of Nationalism, the Empire of Hygiene

positions asia critique , Volume 6 (3) – Dec 1, 1998

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 1998 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1067-9847
eISSN
1527-8271
DOI
10.1215/10679847-6-3-637
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

positions 6:3 0 1998 by Duke University Press. In 1907, one year after the appearance of his first full-length novel, Hakai [Broken Commandment], Shimazaki Toson (1872- 1943), one of modern Japan’s most respected poets and novelists, published an account of the experiences that lay behind the writing of the work.’ In the passage, Toson describes how he began work on Broken Commandment when he was a schoolteacher in the rural village of Komoro, just as the Russo-Japanese War broke out. He recounts numerous visits to the Komoro depot to send off pupils and fellow teachers who were bound for the battlefield. H e goes on: In my far-off mountain home, I heard about the plans of my friends in the city to observe the war, and I too decided to pick u p my pen and follow along with the troops-although in the end that wish went unfulfilled. It was then that I began work on the Broken Commandment manuscript. Life is a battleground, and an author is nothing but its war correspondent: thinking this way, I comforted myself with the thought that I, writing my novel, and my friends, on the far-off plains of Manchuria, were engaged

Journal

positions asia critiqueDuke University Press

Published: Dec 1, 1998

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