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The Development of Negro Religious Music

The Development of Negro Religious Music The Development of Negro Religious Music The recogmuon of development in religious Negro music was greeted with no such manifestations of encouragement as those which tended to make the exhibition of secular Negro effusions in Carnegie Hall so memorable. It is a well-known fact that in practically none of the colored churches of the better class, does the primitive Negro folk song find any place. This is not altogether due to the charge often made that the Negro is trying to forget or divorce himself from the past. The trouble is that many songs which in slavery days probably were full of real or implied significance seem almost meaningless since Emancipation; and when placed alongside of the religious art song and church anthem of the present day appear unspeakably crude, even ludicruous. It is the opinion of the present writer that the ex­ tensive use of Negro folk music for concert and exploitation has had a tendency to dim the lustre of that aurora of religion in which light the songs appear to their greatest and most natural advantage. It is obvious that these soul-born utterances of the slave' s secret feelings were never designed for anything like theatrical http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Black Sacred Music Duke University Press

The Development of Negro Religious Music

Black Sacred Music , Volume 5 (2) – Sep 1, 1991

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Copyright
Copyright © 1991 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1043-9455
eISSN
2640-9879
DOI
10.1215/10439455-5.2.34
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Development of Negro Religious Music The recogmuon of development in religious Negro music was greeted with no such manifestations of encouragement as those which tended to make the exhibition of secular Negro effusions in Carnegie Hall so memorable. It is a well-known fact that in practically none of the colored churches of the better class, does the primitive Negro folk song find any place. This is not altogether due to the charge often made that the Negro is trying to forget or divorce himself from the past. The trouble is that many songs which in slavery days probably were full of real or implied significance seem almost meaningless since Emancipation; and when placed alongside of the religious art song and church anthem of the present day appear unspeakably crude, even ludicruous. It is the opinion of the present writer that the ex­ tensive use of Negro folk music for concert and exploitation has had a tendency to dim the lustre of that aurora of religion in which light the songs appear to their greatest and most natural advantage. It is obvious that these soul-born utterances of the slave' s secret feelings were never designed for anything like theatrical

Journal

Black Sacred MusicDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 1991

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