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The Bitter Tea of Frank Capra

The Bitter Tea of Frank Capra Winter 1995 Figure 1 The Biffer Tea of General Yen, Columbia Films. Courtesy of the George Eastman House. two years, the result was a series of forty-two volumes.’ T h e basic conclusion of this enormous study legitimized the separation of “old immigrants” from “new immigrants,” endowing the former with the ability to assimilate while denying it to the latter, thereby underwriting increased surveillance and exclusion. We find in it a wholesale attempt to reinterpret the powers of Congress with regard to the management of the nation. T h e power to exclude was deemed inherent to a government “belonging to the American People as a sovereign political entity.”2 This argument for the govern- Palumbo-Liu I The Bitter Tea of Frank Capra ment’s sovereign power to exclude went hand in hand with a justification for deporting aliens (Tiaco t’ Forbes, 228 U.S. 549, 1913).From 1921to 1925, nearly thirty thousand people were deported; in the next five years the number more than doubled. In 1924, the court maintained that immunity from prosecution under expost fact0 laws did not apply in deportation cases: if an alien committed an act that was legal at the time it was performed but that http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png positions asia critique Duke University Press

The Bitter Tea of Frank Capra

positions asia critique , Volume 3 (3) – Dec 1, 1995

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 1995 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1067-9847
eISSN
1527-8271
DOI
10.1215/10679847-3-3-759
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Winter 1995 Figure 1 The Biffer Tea of General Yen, Columbia Films. Courtesy of the George Eastman House. two years, the result was a series of forty-two volumes.’ T h e basic conclusion of this enormous study legitimized the separation of “old immigrants” from “new immigrants,” endowing the former with the ability to assimilate while denying it to the latter, thereby underwriting increased surveillance and exclusion. We find in it a wholesale attempt to reinterpret the powers of Congress with regard to the management of the nation. T h e power to exclude was deemed inherent to a government “belonging to the American People as a sovereign political entity.”2 This argument for the govern- Palumbo-Liu I The Bitter Tea of Frank Capra ment’s sovereign power to exclude went hand in hand with a justification for deporting aliens (Tiaco t’ Forbes, 228 U.S. 549, 1913).From 1921to 1925, nearly thirty thousand people were deported; in the next five years the number more than doubled. In 1924, the court maintained that immunity from prosecution under expost fact0 laws did not apply in deportation cases: if an alien committed an act that was legal at the time it was performed but that

Journal

positions asia critiqueDuke University Press

Published: Dec 1, 1995

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