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The Art of Partimento: History, Theory, and Practice/The Italian Traditions and Puccini: Compositional Theory and Practice in Nineteenth-Century Opera

The Art of Partimento: History, Theory, and Practice/The Italian Traditions and Puccini:... Robert O. Gjerdingen Imagine, if you will, a time in the distant future as far removed from us today as we are from the era of Haydn and Mozart. In that future, France has leapt ahead of every other nation to dominate the fields of technology, commerce, and media. A time machine allows us to eavesdrop on the 307th annual meeting of the American Musicological Society, where, in a joint session with the Society for Music Theory, we hear presentations on early music, in particular the session "Popular Music in the 1960s." As speaker after speaker refers to the "Big Three" of Edith Piaf, Jacques Brel, and Serge Gainsbourg, discussing at length how they defined popular music in the sixties, we become more and more uncomfortable. We think, "What about the Beatles? What about the Beach Boys? What about James Brown or Elvis Presley?" but to no avail. The enormous record sales of Anglo-American bands and solo artists, their status as cultural icons, the social significance of soul and funk, all those welldocumented realities seem to count for nothing against the chauvinistic promotion of a few francophone artists. To be sure, Piaf, Brel, and Gainsbourg were fantastic at http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Music Theory Duke University Press

The Art of Partimento: History, Theory, and Practice/The Italian Traditions and Puccini: Compositional Theory and Practice in Nineteenth-Century Opera

Journal of Music Theory , Volume 57 (1) – Mar 20, 2013

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Duke Univ Press
ISSN
0022-2909
eISSN
1941-7497
DOI
10.1215/00222909-2017124
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Robert O. Gjerdingen Imagine, if you will, a time in the distant future as far removed from us today as we are from the era of Haydn and Mozart. In that future, France has leapt ahead of every other nation to dominate the fields of technology, commerce, and media. A time machine allows us to eavesdrop on the 307th annual meeting of the American Musicological Society, where, in a joint session with the Society for Music Theory, we hear presentations on early music, in particular the session "Popular Music in the 1960s." As speaker after speaker refers to the "Big Three" of Edith Piaf, Jacques Brel, and Serge Gainsbourg, discussing at length how they defined popular music in the sixties, we become more and more uncomfortable. We think, "What about the Beatles? What about the Beach Boys? What about James Brown or Elvis Presley?" but to no avail. The enormous record sales of Anglo-American bands and solo artists, their status as cultural icons, the social significance of soul and funk, all those welldocumented realities seem to count for nothing against the chauvinistic promotion of a few francophone artists. To be sure, Piaf, Brel, and Gainsbourg were fantastic at

Journal

Journal of Music TheoryDuke University Press

Published: Mar 20, 2013

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