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The Anathemata and The Roman Martyrology

The Anathemata and The Roman Martyrology September 2003 75 about the mysterious ways of the East, Ezra Jennings too can be identified with the East, from his mixed-race origins and birth at an unnamed Colonial outpost, to his use of opium, a drug often associated with the Orient. Though he is helpful, Ezra Jennings is as mysterious as the Indians who seek the return of the Moonstone. In The Moonstone, character names appear to be more than randomly assigned appellations. Whether Wilkie Collins re­ searched these names and intended these connotations or whether he felt they were simply adequately representative is unknown, but in each case the names fit the characters, further adding to The Moonstone’s appeal for readers. James R. Simmons, Jr. Louisiana Tech University NOTES 1 In David Paroissen, The Companion to Oliver Twist (Edinburgh: Edinburgh UP, 1992) 105, the author notes that due to Charley Bates’s “excessive mirth” and that he is called “Master Bates” so often in Oliver Twist, it is clear that Dickens intended for readers familiar with “the prevailing notions of the extraordinary harm that masturbation caused” to see that the boy was guilty of “self-pollution.” 2 Ian Duncan, “ The Moonstone, the Victorian Novel, and Imperialist Panic.” Modern http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png English Language Notes Duke University Press

The Anathemata and The Roman Martyrology

English Language Notes , Volume 41 (1) – Sep 1, 2003

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Copyright
Copyright © 2003 Regents of the University of Colorado
ISSN
0013-8282
eISSN
2573-3575
DOI
10.1215/00138282-41.1.75
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

September 2003 75 about the mysterious ways of the East, Ezra Jennings too can be identified with the East, from his mixed-race origins and birth at an unnamed Colonial outpost, to his use of opium, a drug often associated with the Orient. Though he is helpful, Ezra Jennings is as mysterious as the Indians who seek the return of the Moonstone. In The Moonstone, character names appear to be more than randomly assigned appellations. Whether Wilkie Collins re­ searched these names and intended these connotations or whether he felt they were simply adequately representative is unknown, but in each case the names fit the characters, further adding to The Moonstone’s appeal for readers. James R. Simmons, Jr. Louisiana Tech University NOTES 1 In David Paroissen, The Companion to Oliver Twist (Edinburgh: Edinburgh UP, 1992) 105, the author notes that due to Charley Bates’s “excessive mirth” and that he is called “Master Bates” so often in Oliver Twist, it is clear that Dickens intended for readers familiar with “the prevailing notions of the extraordinary harm that masturbation caused” to see that the boy was guilty of “self-pollution.” 2 Ian Duncan, “ The Moonstone, the Victorian Novel, and Imperialist Panic.” Modern

Journal

English Language NotesDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 2003

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