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The Aesthetics of Music Roger Scruton New York: Oxford University Press, 1997; paperback ed., 1999 xx, 530 pp.

The Aesthetics of Music Roger Scruton New York: Oxford University Press, 1997; paperback ed.,... scure—except when he is genuinely confused about a point. Secondly, no-go areas do not exist for him. High and low culture, Classical and popular music, Western and non-Western repertoires, instrumental and vocal styles, ancient and modern writers, literature, painting, architecture— these are invoked sometimes in depth, sometimes in passing, always with conviction, and often accompanied by sharp opinions. This makes for generally lively reading even when one disagrees with the author. Thirdly, the book conveys the author’s love for and intimate knowledge of a broad range of compositions. Musical readers will enjoy playing through or listening (silently) to the numerous excerpts of well-known as well as obscure compositions, including the author’s own. This, then, is a book to he heard as well as read, perhaps in the tradition of Charles Rosen’s The Classical Style (1971) and The Romantic Generation (1995), and in striking contrast to that of Dahlhaus’s Esthetics of Music, which contains not a single musical example. Of course, the reproduction of score excerpts does not guarantee the strength or persuasiveness of Scruton’s philosophical argument. What it does, however, is to draw aesthetic inquiry closer to music analysis, and—indirectly—to promote a view of analysis as performance, as http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Music Theory Duke University Press

The Aesthetics of Music Roger Scruton New York: Oxford University Press, 1997; paperback ed., 1999 xx, 530 pp.

Journal of Music Theory , Volume 44 (2) – Jan 1, 2000

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2000 by Yale University
ISSN
0022-2909
eISSN
1941-7497
DOI
10.1215/00222909-44-2-487
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

scure—except when he is genuinely confused about a point. Secondly, no-go areas do not exist for him. High and low culture, Classical and popular music, Western and non-Western repertoires, instrumental and vocal styles, ancient and modern writers, literature, painting, architecture— these are invoked sometimes in depth, sometimes in passing, always with conviction, and often accompanied by sharp opinions. This makes for generally lively reading even when one disagrees with the author. Thirdly, the book conveys the author’s love for and intimate knowledge of a broad range of compositions. Musical readers will enjoy playing through or listening (silently) to the numerous excerpts of well-known as well as obscure compositions, including the author’s own. This, then, is a book to he heard as well as read, perhaps in the tradition of Charles Rosen’s The Classical Style (1971) and The Romantic Generation (1995), and in striking contrast to that of Dahlhaus’s Esthetics of Music, which contains not a single musical example. Of course, the reproduction of score excerpts does not guarantee the strength or persuasiveness of Scruton’s philosophical argument. What it does, however, is to draw aesthetic inquiry closer to music analysis, and—indirectly—to promote a view of analysis as performance, as

Journal

Journal of Music TheoryDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2000

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