Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Thalassological Worldmaking and Literary Circularities in the Indian Ocean

Thalassological Worldmaking and Literary Circularities in the Indian Ocean Although the study of Indian Ocean literary circularities is a relatively new and dynamic field, it calls for alternative paradigms for global literary history in light of the nascent conversation between comparative world literature and oceanic studies. Following the creative work of prominent writers of the Indian Ocean (including Abdulrazak Gurnah, the winner of the 2021 Nobel Prize in Literature), the concept of literary circularities is anchored in the study of multiple intersecting and networked sites of exchange, circulation, migration, and encounter in this vast oceanic space that has mediated a dynamic cross-cultural traffic across Asia, Africa, and the Middle East. In response to the territorial logic of old and new comparative literature, the polysemic nature of the Indian Ocean invites the following the question: what would world literature look like when terracentric biases of the field are unsettled? In other words, how does the thalassological poetics of the Indian Ocean also remap approaches to literary categories themselves? The Indian Ocean’s literary waves and the generic wateriness they create offer a set of analytical categories as they rescale narrative as a living, moving, recombining, recycling practice of memory, connection, and connectivity. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Comparative Literature Duke University Press

Thalassological Worldmaking and Literary Circularities in the Indian Ocean

Loading next page...
 
/lp/duke-university-press/thalassological-worldmaking-and-literary-circularities-in-the-indian-N09660Wh0C
Copyright
Copyright © 2022 by University of Oregon
ISSN
0010-4124
eISSN
1945-8517
DOI
10.1215/00104124-9594787
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Although the study of Indian Ocean literary circularities is a relatively new and dynamic field, it calls for alternative paradigms for global literary history in light of the nascent conversation between comparative world literature and oceanic studies. Following the creative work of prominent writers of the Indian Ocean (including Abdulrazak Gurnah, the winner of the 2021 Nobel Prize in Literature), the concept of literary circularities is anchored in the study of multiple intersecting and networked sites of exchange, circulation, migration, and encounter in this vast oceanic space that has mediated a dynamic cross-cultural traffic across Asia, Africa, and the Middle East. In response to the territorial logic of old and new comparative literature, the polysemic nature of the Indian Ocean invites the following the question: what would world literature look like when terracentric biases of the field are unsettled? In other words, how does the thalassological poetics of the Indian Ocean also remap approaches to literary categories themselves? The Indian Ocean’s literary waves and the generic wateriness they create offer a set of analytical categories as they rescale narrative as a living, moving, recombining, recycling practice of memory, connection, and connectivity.

Journal

Comparative LiteratureDuke University Press

Published: Jun 1, 2022

References