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Text, Texture, and Context in Theological Perspective

Text, Texture, and Context in Theological Perspective Downloaded from http://read.dukeupress.edu/black-sacred-music/article-pdf/8/1/64/793207/64nelson.pdf by DEEPDYVE INC user on 13 February 2021 Text, Texture, and Context in Theological Perspective Angela M. S. Nelson In attempting to define folklore, Alan Dundes states that the defini­ tion must come from internal rather than external criteria, which led him in 1962 to propose these three levels of analysis-context, tex­ ture, and text.I My intent is to adapt this analytical paradigm to my exploration of the similarities between the theological nature of two important forms of black secular music-blues and rap . My applica­ tion of this triadic analytical construct will hopefully serve as a model for the theomusicological analysis of other forms of music, both secular and sacred. Text Song lyric is perhaps the most revealing component in secular musi­ cal forms because the prevailing attitudes and values of African Americans are usually explicitly expressed in words.2 While the text can be considered independent of its texture and even translated into other languages, a consideration of a song's texture alone !for exam­ ple, its rhythms and meters) cannot give us specific information about theological meaning in music. Perhaps for this reason the majority of studies on the blues, for instance, have dealt with http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Black Sacred Music Duke University Press

Text, Texture, and Context in Theological Perspective

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Copyright
Copyright © 1994 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1043-9455
eISSN
2640-9879
DOI
10.1215/10439455-8.1.64
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Downloaded from http://read.dukeupress.edu/black-sacred-music/article-pdf/8/1/64/793207/64nelson.pdf by DEEPDYVE INC user on 13 February 2021 Text, Texture, and Context in Theological Perspective Angela M. S. Nelson In attempting to define folklore, Alan Dundes states that the defini­ tion must come from internal rather than external criteria, which led him in 1962 to propose these three levels of analysis-context, tex­ ture, and text.I My intent is to adapt this analytical paradigm to my exploration of the similarities between the theological nature of two important forms of black secular music-blues and rap . My applica­ tion of this triadic analytical construct will hopefully serve as a model for the theomusicological analysis of other forms of music, both secular and sacred. Text Song lyric is perhaps the most revealing component in secular musi­ cal forms because the prevailing attitudes and values of African Americans are usually explicitly expressed in words.2 While the text can be considered independent of its texture and even translated into other languages, a consideration of a song's texture alone !for exam­ ple, its rhythms and meters) cannot give us specific information about theological meaning in music. Perhaps for this reason the majority of studies on the blues, for instance, have dealt with

Journal

Black Sacred MusicDuke University Press

Published: Mar 1, 1994

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