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Tears of Ressentiment; or, Zhang Zhupo's Jin Ping Mei

Tears of Ressentiment; or, Zhang Zhupo's Jin Ping Mei positions 3:3 Winter 1995 T h e question I begin with is, What are the social and subjective stakes of the specific reading practices that produced a widely circulated vernacular fiction- ostensibly about the personal and political dangers of desiring sexually aggressive women? The /PM’s earliest extant printed edition appeared in the Wanli (1573-1620) reign of the Ming dynasty and includes a preface dated 1618.3 Another extant edition was published during the Chongzhen (1628-1645) reign. Zhang Zhupo’s (1670-1698) commentated text, which is the focus of this essay, is based on a version of the Chongzhen edition and was printed in 1695. It subsequently became “the most widely disseminated and influential” of all the extant editions.4 But to speak of a commentated text is to misrepresent Zhang Zhupo’s project. His interpretations and evaluative essays, pre-hui (chapter) notations and marginalia, together produce an “other” J P M , one that is distinctly literary and ambivalently erotic. Zhang Zhupo “reads/writes” his/PM; his reading is a mode of re-writing, a writing that passes itself off as mere reading. I use “read/write” to stress the extent to which editorial practices that evolved in the context of a widespread urban vernacular print culture from http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png positions asia critique Duke University Press

Tears of Ressentiment; or, Zhang Zhupo's Jin Ping Mei

positions asia critique , Volume 3 (3) – Dec 1, 1995

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 1995 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1067-9847
eISSN
1527-8271
DOI
10.1215/10679847-3-3-663
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

positions 3:3 Winter 1995 T h e question I begin with is, What are the social and subjective stakes of the specific reading practices that produced a widely circulated vernacular fiction- ostensibly about the personal and political dangers of desiring sexually aggressive women? The /PM’s earliest extant printed edition appeared in the Wanli (1573-1620) reign of the Ming dynasty and includes a preface dated 1618.3 Another extant edition was published during the Chongzhen (1628-1645) reign. Zhang Zhupo’s (1670-1698) commentated text, which is the focus of this essay, is based on a version of the Chongzhen edition and was printed in 1695. It subsequently became “the most widely disseminated and influential” of all the extant editions.4 But to speak of a commentated text is to misrepresent Zhang Zhupo’s project. His interpretations and evaluative essays, pre-hui (chapter) notations and marginalia, together produce an “other” J P M , one that is distinctly literary and ambivalently erotic. Zhang Zhupo “reads/writes” his/PM; his reading is a mode of re-writing, a writing that passes itself off as mere reading. I use “read/write” to stress the extent to which editorial practices that evolved in the context of a widespread urban vernacular print culture from

Journal

positions asia critiqueDuke University Press

Published: Dec 1, 1995

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