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Teaching Life Writing as Civic EducationThe Case of Palestinian and Jewish Narratives in the Israeli Undergraduate Classroom

Teaching Life Writing as Civic EducationThe Case of Palestinian and Jewish Narratives in the... Focusing on a course taught to Palestinian and Jewish Israelis, this essay suggests that the study of life writing can help students develop a better informed civic identity, particularly in relation to divisive national matters. By carefully constructing collective classroom practices of reading, writing, discussing, and listening, the instructor can forge an environment that strengthens students’ capacity to appreciate the textual and contemporary interaction between individuals and their historical contexts, and to hear alternative perspectives and experiences attentively, without argument. University classrooms can thus play a vital role in democratic culture, as spaces in which a broader range of voices can be heard and in which minority voices are specially protected and projected. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Pedagogy Duke University Press

Teaching Life Writing as Civic EducationThe Case of Palestinian and Jewish Narratives in the Israeli Undergraduate Classroom

Pedagogy , Volume 22 (2) – Apr 1, 2022

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Copyright
Copyright © 2022 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1531-4200
eISSN
1533-6255
DOI
10.1215/15314200-9576398
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Focusing on a course taught to Palestinian and Jewish Israelis, this essay suggests that the study of life writing can help students develop a better informed civic identity, particularly in relation to divisive national matters. By carefully constructing collective classroom practices of reading, writing, discussing, and listening, the instructor can forge an environment that strengthens students’ capacity to appreciate the textual and contemporary interaction between individuals and their historical contexts, and to hear alternative perspectives and experiences attentively, without argument. University classrooms can thus play a vital role in democratic culture, as spaces in which a broader range of voices can be heard and in which minority voices are specially protected and projected.

Journal

PedagogyDuke University Press

Published: Apr 1, 2022

References