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Suggesting a “National Anthem”

Suggesting a “National Anthem” Downloaded from http://read.dukeupress.edu/black-sacred-music/article-pdf/8/2/71/793250/71pickens.pdf by DEEPDYVE INC user on 13 February 2021 Suggesting a uNational Anthem" William Pickens Members of the Congress of the United States have been interested in the prospect of adopting a "National Anthem" officially and by law. "The Star-Spangled Banner" seems rather belligerent and is associated with hostility to England and all things British. And "My Country 'Tis of Thee" is a rather weak statement, full of beautiful poetic lies. And the other song-"America, the Beautiful," or what­ ever it is-is lovely enough, and really too lovely. It does not show the other side of the shield; it is a nice Sunday school hymn. But out of the heart, soul, suffering, and history of the American Negro has come a song which it would be well for Congress to adopt: "Lift Every Voice and Sing." It is sometimes called the "Negro National Anthem:' or "Racial Anthem," but it has no limitations in its own words and sentiments to Negroes or to any other race. It could be a song of those who struggle upward anywhere in the world. It could even be the song of the citizens of the world state which we vision now through our League of Nations and our World Court. Its appeal is universal. It is neither partisan nor class-con­ scious. It is the song of all of us, strong or weak, who struggle for­ ward over our dead selves. The Negro women of the United States, who are quick to see through the eyes of the heart, by decision of their national organiza­ tion, adopted this song. Others have adopted it by use. Here's a song for Congress to consider. It matters not that a Negro wrote the words, and that another Negro wrote the music. It is out of the Negro that we could best evolve a song for the struggling race called Man. Black Sacred Music 8:2, Fall 1994 . Reprinted with permission from Th e N ew York Amsterdam N ews, 2 April 1930, 2 . http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Black Sacred Music Duke University Press

Suggesting a “National Anthem”

Black Sacred Music , Volume 8 (2) – Sep 1, 1994

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Copyright
Copyright © 1994 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1043-9455
eISSN
2640-9879
DOI
10.1215/10439455-8.2.71
Publisher site
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Abstract

Downloaded from http://read.dukeupress.edu/black-sacred-music/article-pdf/8/2/71/793250/71pickens.pdf by DEEPDYVE INC user on 13 February 2021 Suggesting a uNational Anthem" William Pickens Members of the Congress of the United States have been interested in the prospect of adopting a "National Anthem" officially and by law. "The Star-Spangled Banner" seems rather belligerent and is associated with hostility to England and all things British. And "My Country 'Tis of Thee" is a rather weak statement, full of beautiful poetic lies. And the other song-"America, the Beautiful," or what­ ever it is-is lovely enough, and really too lovely. It does not show the other side of the shield; it is a nice Sunday school hymn. But out of the heart, soul, suffering, and history of the American Negro has come a song which it would be well for Congress to adopt: "Lift Every Voice and Sing." It is sometimes called the "Negro National Anthem:' or "Racial Anthem," but it has no limitations in its own words and sentiments to Negroes or to any other race. It could be a song of those who struggle upward anywhere in the world. It could even be the song of the citizens of the world state which we vision now through our League of Nations and our World Court. Its appeal is universal. It is neither partisan nor class-con­ scious. It is the song of all of us, strong or weak, who struggle for­ ward over our dead selves. The Negro women of the United States, who are quick to see through the eyes of the heart, by decision of their national organiza­ tion, adopted this song. Others have adopted it by use. Here's a song for Congress to consider. It matters not that a Negro wrote the words, and that another Negro wrote the music. It is out of the Negro that we could best evolve a song for the struggling race called Man. Black Sacred Music 8:2, Fall 1994 . Reprinted with permission from Th e N ew York Amsterdam N ews, 2 April 1930, 2 .

Journal

Black Sacred MusicDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 1994

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