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Submarine Futures of the Anthropocene

Submarine Futures of the Anthropocene This essay outlines the development of the “oceanic turn” and the rise of “critical ocean studies” as vital to figuring the Anthropocene. It builds upon the work of Elizabeth Povinelli's theory of “geontologies,” and by turning to the submarine sculptures of Jason deCaires Taylor it argues for a provocative Caribbean aesthetic of “sea ontologies.” By examining the multispecies collaborations of coral and reef ecologies, it suggests a new oceanic imaginary for the more-than-human Anthropocene. Anthropocene Caribbean environmental art Derek Walcott Jason deCaires Taylor http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Comparative Literature Duke University Press

Submarine Futures of the Anthropocene

Comparative Literature , Volume 69 (1) – Mar 1, 2017

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Duke Univ Press
ISSN
0010-4124
eISSN
1945-8517
DOI
10.1215/00104124-3794589
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This essay outlines the development of the “oceanic turn” and the rise of “critical ocean studies” as vital to figuring the Anthropocene. It builds upon the work of Elizabeth Povinelli's theory of “geontologies,” and by turning to the submarine sculptures of Jason deCaires Taylor it argues for a provocative Caribbean aesthetic of “sea ontologies.” By examining the multispecies collaborations of coral and reef ecologies, it suggests a new oceanic imaginary for the more-than-human Anthropocene. Anthropocene Caribbean environmental art Derek Walcott Jason deCaires Taylor

Journal

Comparative LiteratureDuke University Press

Published: Mar 1, 2017

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