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Style and Idea in the Lyric Suite of Alban Berg

Style and Idea in the Lyric Suite of Alban Berg an integral part of the program (this passage will be discussed further below). On the other hand, although he separates the program from the analysis, Perle also notes that our knowledge of the song in the last movement changes our perception “so decisively as to reduce the version that has been known until now to the status of an ‘arrangement,’ with no more title to acceptance as an ultimately authentic representation than has the familiar orchestral version of the Liebestod from Tristan und Isolde” (56). But, what then did Berg leave in his second quartet? An unfinished work similar to the two-act version of Lulu and one that similarly needs to be “completed” (by realizing the hidden song in the last movement)? Perle writes that, in his opinion, although the music of the final movement was “conceived and composed around and on a text,” Berg “knew that this text [in the sixth movement] would not form part of the final version of the work” and that “he intended even the role of the text in the compositional process to remain a secret” (49). But if that was Berg’s intention, then in what sense is the instrumental version incomplete? http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Music Theory Duke University Press

Style and Idea in the Lyric Suite of Alban Berg

Journal of Music Theory , Volume 43 (2) – Jan 1, 1999

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 1999 by Yale University
ISSN
0022-2909
eISSN
1941-7497
DOI
10.1215/00222909-43-2-349
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

an integral part of the program (this passage will be discussed further below). On the other hand, although he separates the program from the analysis, Perle also notes that our knowledge of the song in the last movement changes our perception “so decisively as to reduce the version that has been known until now to the status of an ‘arrangement,’ with no more title to acceptance as an ultimately authentic representation than has the familiar orchestral version of the Liebestod from Tristan und Isolde” (56). But, what then did Berg leave in his second quartet? An unfinished work similar to the two-act version of Lulu and one that similarly needs to be “completed” (by realizing the hidden song in the last movement)? Perle writes that, in his opinion, although the music of the final movement was “conceived and composed around and on a text,” Berg “knew that this text [in the sixth movement] would not form part of the final version of the work” and that “he intended even the role of the text in the compositional process to remain a secret” (49). But if that was Berg’s intention, then in what sense is the instrumental version incomplete?

Journal

Journal of Music TheoryDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 1999

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