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Spring, Temporality, and History in Li Dazhao

Spring, Temporality, and History in Li Dazhao positions 3:2 0 1995by Duke University Press positions 3:2 Fall 1995 dimming of the possibility of emancipatory politics globally, the same “revolutionary politics” that for two centuries now has provided progressives with a common beacon. Consequently, we find ourselves surrounded by a generalized belief in the brutality of profit taking as the sole condition of social life. And because these immediate realities- the decline of emancipatory thinking and the abandonment of alternatives to marketizationshape modern political culture, approaching the thinking of Li Dazhao is made doubly difficult. What I propose here is a way out of our present tangle, a way that stresses the singular subjective attitude of the intellectual Li Dazhao within China’s very special political and social conditions. However, my analysis also reminds us that our own intellectual impasse may indeed have much in common with that which Chinese intellectuals encountered at the beginning of the first decade of this century. Though it would be misleading to say that we find ourselves in the exact same state as Li Dazhao, it is true that, different as our immediate circumstances may be, we share with him the general decay in the framework of cultural references that previously http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png positions asia critique Duke University Press

Spring, Temporality, and History in Li Dazhao

positions asia critique , Volume 3 (2) – Sep 1, 1995

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 1995 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1067-9847
eISSN
1527-8271
DOI
10.1215/10679847-3-2-283
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

positions 3:2 0 1995by Duke University Press positions 3:2 Fall 1995 dimming of the possibility of emancipatory politics globally, the same “revolutionary politics” that for two centuries now has provided progressives with a common beacon. Consequently, we find ourselves surrounded by a generalized belief in the brutality of profit taking as the sole condition of social life. And because these immediate realities- the decline of emancipatory thinking and the abandonment of alternatives to marketizationshape modern political culture, approaching the thinking of Li Dazhao is made doubly difficult. What I propose here is a way out of our present tangle, a way that stresses the singular subjective attitude of the intellectual Li Dazhao within China’s very special political and social conditions. However, my analysis also reminds us that our own intellectual impasse may indeed have much in common with that which Chinese intellectuals encountered at the beginning of the first decade of this century. Though it would be misleading to say that we find ourselves in the exact same state as Li Dazhao, it is true that, different as our immediate circumstances may be, we share with him the general decay in the framework of cultural references that previously

Journal

positions asia critiqueDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 1995

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