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Southeast Asian Refugees and Investors in Our Midst

Southeast Asian Refugees and Investors in Our Midst 0 1995 by Duke University Press rethinking of basic premises represents a coming-to-terms with differences that are not absolutes but are ambiguous, flexible, and confusing; as we are no ler sure who they really are, we cannot know for sure who we are. For old-fashioned western liberals, diaspora offered the fantasy of the melting pot, made entirely of Anglo-American norms and values, in which others become “more like us.” For the New Left, global immigration promised a nation of cultural hybrids, a kind of intercultural subjectivity fostering new, transnational solidarities against totalitarian forces and rabid nationalism on the one hand and the excesses of capitalist and environmental exploitation on the other. Yet, increasingly, immigrants from a newly affluent Asia are more concerned with free trade than human rights, and the economic successes of their countries of origin challenge U.S. civic faith that full-fledged democracy and capitalism go hand in hand. Another U.S. assumption about immigrants is also being undermined by the influx of Asians in the aftermath of the Indochina War. To most Americans, immigration from communist countries reaffirms the United States’ notion of itself as a refuge for political exiles and confirms its image as a bastion http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png positions asia critique Duke University Press

Southeast Asian Refugees and Investors in Our Midst

positions asia critique , Volume 3 (3) – Dec 1, 1995

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 1995 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1067-9847
eISSN
1527-8271
DOI
10.1215/10679847-3-3-806
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

0 1995 by Duke University Press rethinking of basic premises represents a coming-to-terms with differences that are not absolutes but are ambiguous, flexible, and confusing; as we are no ler sure who they really are, we cannot know for sure who we are. For old-fashioned western liberals, diaspora offered the fantasy of the melting pot, made entirely of Anglo-American norms and values, in which others become “more like us.” For the New Left, global immigration promised a nation of cultural hybrids, a kind of intercultural subjectivity fostering new, transnational solidarities against totalitarian forces and rabid nationalism on the one hand and the excesses of capitalist and environmental exploitation on the other. Yet, increasingly, immigrants from a newly affluent Asia are more concerned with free trade than human rights, and the economic successes of their countries of origin challenge U.S. civic faith that full-fledged democracy and capitalism go hand in hand. Another U.S. assumption about immigrants is also being undermined by the influx of Asians in the aftermath of the Indochina War. To most Americans, immigration from communist countries reaffirms the United States’ notion of itself as a refuge for political exiles and confirms its image as a bastion

Journal

positions asia critiqueDuke University Press

Published: Dec 1, 1995

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