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South Koreans in the Debt Crisis: The Creation of a Neoliberal Welfare Society

South Koreans in the Debt Crisis: The Creation of a Neoliberal Welfare Society Book Reviews 157 3. On the map titled "Provinces of Ming China" on page 14, the Korean peninsula is identified by the Chinese-style name "Chaoxian" and is separated from Liaodong with the same type of line as used to delineate Chinese provincial borders. Swope moreover fails to notify readers that the Korean measuring unit of Ii (appr oximately 0.392 kilome­ ters) was not equivalent to the Ming Chinese one (0 .5 55 kilometers). 4. Swope also makes questionable assertions concerning peoples on the peripheries of the conflict. He says: "some Jurchen tribespeople and Ryukyu islanders had offered to join the allied armies. This delighted the Chinese, who figured that they could now use the time-h onored strategy of using barbarians to fight barbarians" (p. 244). But both the Chinese and the Koreans were not necessarily delighted because they rather feared that their military weakness might be detected by the Jurchens. In fact, that is the very reason why Nurhaci's offer to enter the war was rejected by the Beijing authority twice in 15 93 and 15 97, respe ctively. SEUNG B. KYE So oANG UNIVERSITY * * * South Koreans in the Debt Crisis: The Creation of a Neoliberal http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Korean Studies Duke University Press

South Koreans in the Debt Crisis: The Creation of a Neoliberal Welfare Society

Journal of Korean Studies , Volume 16 (1) – Mar 11, 2011

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Copyright
Copyright © 2011 by the Trustees of Columbia University in the City of New York
ISSN
0731-1613
eISSN
2158-1665
DOI
10.1353/jks.2011.0007
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Book Reviews 157 3. On the map titled "Provinces of Ming China" on page 14, the Korean peninsula is identified by the Chinese-style name "Chaoxian" and is separated from Liaodong with the same type of line as used to delineate Chinese provincial borders. Swope moreover fails to notify readers that the Korean measuring unit of Ii (appr oximately 0.392 kilome­ ters) was not equivalent to the Ming Chinese one (0 .5 55 kilometers). 4. Swope also makes questionable assertions concerning peoples on the peripheries of the conflict. He says: "some Jurchen tribespeople and Ryukyu islanders had offered to join the allied armies. This delighted the Chinese, who figured that they could now use the time-h onored strategy of using barbarians to fight barbarians" (p. 244). But both the Chinese and the Koreans were not necessarily delighted because they rather feared that their military weakness might be detected by the Jurchens. In fact, that is the very reason why Nurhaci's offer to enter the war was rejected by the Beijing authority twice in 15 93 and 15 97, respe ctively. SEUNG B. KYE So oANG UNIVERSITY * * * South Koreans in the Debt Crisis: The Creation of a Neoliberal

Journal

Journal of Korean StudiesDuke University Press

Published: Mar 11, 2011

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