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Sounding Off: Theorizing Disability in Music

Sounding Off: Theorizing Disability in Music the psychoanalytic cure at the other. Disability studies are located along a similar continuum—with disability as medical condition at one extreme and disability as social construct on the other. Imagine a linear representation of discourses of the other: at one end are essentialist claims—pure, necessary, ontological; at the other end is language—stained, contingent, epistemological. Discourses of the other situate themselves awkwardly between these extremes. These situations are awkward because the elements at the extremes belong to different logical classes (“reality” and “representation,” to put it crudely). Being committed to a discourse of the other requires either that one commit to one extreme at the expense of the other, or that one enjoy the friction between the two. The best discourses of alterity do not hide the traces of such friction. Discourses of the other have emerged in recent years at the fringes of the disciplines of musicology, music theory, ethnomusicology, film music studies, popular music studies, and so forth. The other has lain dormant within traditional musicological research, in Schenkerian voice-leading analyses, in atonal set-theoretical analyses, in musical-theoretical work in cognition, and in methodologies established before the era of the classic writings in mid- to late-twentieth-century race, class, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Music Theory Duke University Press

Sounding Off: Theorizing Disability in Music

Journal of Music Theory , Volume 49 (1) – Jan 1, 2005

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2005 by Yale University
ISSN
0022-2909
eISSN
1941-7497
DOI
10.1215/00222909-2007-006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

the psychoanalytic cure at the other. Disability studies are located along a similar continuum—with disability as medical condition at one extreme and disability as social construct on the other. Imagine a linear representation of discourses of the other: at one end are essentialist claims—pure, necessary, ontological; at the other end is language—stained, contingent, epistemological. Discourses of the other situate themselves awkwardly between these extremes. These situations are awkward because the elements at the extremes belong to different logical classes (“reality” and “representation,” to put it crudely). Being committed to a discourse of the other requires either that one commit to one extreme at the expense of the other, or that one enjoy the friction between the two. The best discourses of alterity do not hide the traces of such friction. Discourses of the other have emerged in recent years at the fringes of the disciplines of musicology, music theory, ethnomusicology, film music studies, popular music studies, and so forth. The other has lain dormant within traditional musicological research, in Schenkerian voice-leading analyses, in atonal set-theoretical analyses, in musical-theoretical work in cognition, and in methodologies established before the era of the classic writings in mid- to late-twentieth-century race, class,

Journal

Journal of Music TheoryDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2005

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