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Shokuminchi Chōsen ni okeru Chōsengo shorei seisaku: Chōsengo wo mananda Nihonjin [Japan’s Korean Language Encouragement Policies in Colonial Korea: Japanese Who Learned the Korean Language]

Shokuminchi Chōsen ni okeru Chōsengo shorei seisaku: Chōsengo wo mananda Nihonjin [Japan’s Korean... 186 The Journal of Korean Studies a global experience of coloniality (after all, 85 percent of the world was colo­ nized by Europe, the United States, and Japan by the end of World War I). Yu Young-nan has brought considerable skill and experience to this transla­ tion of Yam's 1948 revision of Three Generations. Yu's translation combines faithfulness to the original with creativity and readability-a difficult bal­ ance to achieve. Due to Yu's fine translation, the English-speaking world can now come closer to understanding Korea's experience of a global, colonial modernity. REVIEWED BY THEO DORE HUGHES COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Shokuminchi Chosen ni okeru Chosengo shorei seisaku: Chosengo wo mananda Nihon jin [Japan's Korean Language Encouragement Policies in Colonial Korea: Japanese Who Learned the Korean Language], by Yamada Kanta. Tokyo: Fuji shuppan, 2004. 266 pp. ¥4,800. Japan is often criticized for its colonial language policies that aimed to replace indigenous languages with kokugo (literally, national language) or Japanese. Yamada Kanta, in examining the Japanese colonial administration's encour­ agement of Korean language study among Japanese living in Korea, demon­ strates that if this administration intended to eliminate the Korean language, it was a delayed ambition. Realizing the value of Japanese civil servants http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Korean Studies Duke University Press

Shokuminchi Chōsen ni okeru Chōsengo shorei seisaku: Chōsengo wo mananda Nihonjin [Japan’s Korean Language Encouragement Policies in Colonial Korea: Japanese Who Learned the Korean Language]

Journal of Korean Studies , Volume 10 (1) – Sep 1, 2005

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Copyright
Copyright © 2005 by the Trustees of Columbia University in the City of New York
ISSN
0731-1613
eISSN
2158-1665
DOI
10.1353/jks.2005.0005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

186 The Journal of Korean Studies a global experience of coloniality (after all, 85 percent of the world was colo­ nized by Europe, the United States, and Japan by the end of World War I). Yu Young-nan has brought considerable skill and experience to this transla­ tion of Yam's 1948 revision of Three Generations. Yu's translation combines faithfulness to the original with creativity and readability-a difficult bal­ ance to achieve. Due to Yu's fine translation, the English-speaking world can now come closer to understanding Korea's experience of a global, colonial modernity. REVIEWED BY THEO DORE HUGHES COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Shokuminchi Chosen ni okeru Chosengo shorei seisaku: Chosengo wo mananda Nihon jin [Japan's Korean Language Encouragement Policies in Colonial Korea: Japanese Who Learned the Korean Language], by Yamada Kanta. Tokyo: Fuji shuppan, 2004. 266 pp. ¥4,800. Japan is often criticized for its colonial language policies that aimed to replace indigenous languages with kokugo (literally, national language) or Japanese. Yamada Kanta, in examining the Japanese colonial administration's encour­ agement of Korean language study among Japanese living in Korea, demon­ strates that if this administration intended to eliminate the Korean language, it was a delayed ambition. Realizing the value of Japanese civil servants

Journal

Journal of Korean StudiesDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 2005

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