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Shaping Time: Music, The Brain, and Performance, a response to William Rothstein

Shaping Time: Music, The Brain, and Performance, a response to William Rothstein effect of further “confusing” the sense of time, of beat, of activity. In essence there are two calculi at work in the passage, one effecting change via stringendo il tempo, the second creating change through the altered meter and its attendant activity within the beat. The result is described in Shaping Time—in essence, that “when the Presto theme arrives we are left momentarily ‘beatless’, unaware for at least one beat (if not a bar or more) what the tempo, pacing, motion may be” (234). By the same token, Beethoven sets the stage at this point for the Trio—for its tempo, and for the psychological sense of pace. The details that control that pace—pedal tone, restricted thematic range, “uncomplicated” melodic direction, soft dynamics, light articulations, essentially static harmony primarily consisting of local activity, etc. are discussed on p. 235. In its entirety the passage effects a transformation of perception more akin perhaps to late nineteenth-century practice or that of our own era than to 1817–1823—a modulation of pacing, tempo, and details of activity achieved with the subtlety of an “unseen hand.” We emerge from change, that is, before we are fully aware of what has changed. The second conundrum, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Music Theory Duke University Press

Shaping Time: Music, The Brain, and Performance, a response to William Rothstein

Journal of Music Theory , Volume 43 (1) – Jan 1, 1999

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 1999 by Yale University
ISSN
0022-2909
eISSN
1941-7497
DOI
10.1215/00222909-43-1-165
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

effect of further “confusing” the sense of time, of beat, of activity. In essence there are two calculi at work in the passage, one effecting change via stringendo il tempo, the second creating change through the altered meter and its attendant activity within the beat. The result is described in Shaping Time—in essence, that “when the Presto theme arrives we are left momentarily ‘beatless’, unaware for at least one beat (if not a bar or more) what the tempo, pacing, motion may be” (234). By the same token, Beethoven sets the stage at this point for the Trio—for its tempo, and for the psychological sense of pace. The details that control that pace—pedal tone, restricted thematic range, “uncomplicated” melodic direction, soft dynamics, light articulations, essentially static harmony primarily consisting of local activity, etc. are discussed on p. 235. In its entirety the passage effects a transformation of perception more akin perhaps to late nineteenth-century practice or that of our own era than to 1817–1823—a modulation of pacing, tempo, and details of activity achieved with the subtlety of an “unseen hand.” We emerge from change, that is, before we are fully aware of what has changed. The second conundrum,

Journal

Journal of Music TheoryDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 1999

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