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Seeing Past Destruction: Trauma and History in Kaiko Takeshi

Seeing Past Destruction: Trauma and History in Kaiko Takeshi positions 15:3 Winter 2007 Introduction On July 18, 1965, the Sunday Mainichi magazine published an article trumpeting its release of “rediscovered” World War II – era photos, a set of images that depicted “the long fifteen years of war, from the Manchurian Incident and the China War to the Pacific conflict.”1 These previously censored images, part of over twenty-four thousand negatives in total, had been “secretly safeguarded” by the Mainichi newspaper organization for over two decades, an act that, as the editors put it in the article’s preface, rescued them from the air raids, incineration orders, and occupation directives that had destroyed so much of the war’s pictorial record.2 In the early months of 1965, the editors proclaimed, the company had decided to pull the negatives from their basement packing crates, restore them for publication, and show them to the world.3 But even as editors emphasized the timeless significance of their “hidden record,” they nevertheless acknowledged that the appearance and publication of these photos in 1965 was due in large part to the retrospective mood of the reading public.4 The twenty-year anniversary of the end of the war brought a rash of books chronicling the country’s past, both http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png positions asia critique Duke University Press

Seeing Past Destruction: Trauma and History in Kaiko Takeshi

positions asia critique , Volume 15 (3) – Dec 1, 2007

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2007 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1067-9847
eISSN
1527-8271
DOI
10.1215/10679847-2007-002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

positions 15:3 Winter 2007 Introduction On July 18, 1965, the Sunday Mainichi magazine published an article trumpeting its release of “rediscovered” World War II – era photos, a set of images that depicted “the long fifteen years of war, from the Manchurian Incident and the China War to the Pacific conflict.”1 These previously censored images, part of over twenty-four thousand negatives in total, had been “secretly safeguarded” by the Mainichi newspaper organization for over two decades, an act that, as the editors put it in the article’s preface, rescued them from the air raids, incineration orders, and occupation directives that had destroyed so much of the war’s pictorial record.2 In the early months of 1965, the editors proclaimed, the company had decided to pull the negatives from their basement packing crates, restore them for publication, and show them to the world.3 But even as editors emphasized the timeless significance of their “hidden record,” they nevertheless acknowledged that the appearance and publication of these photos in 1965 was due in large part to the retrospective mood of the reading public.4 The twenty-year anniversary of the end of the war brought a rash of books chronicling the country’s past, both

Journal

positions asia critiqueDuke University Press

Published: Dec 1, 2007

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