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Science and Literature in Korea: An Introduction

Science and Literature in Korea: An Introduction Science and Literature in Korea: An Introduction Dafna Zur and Christopher P. Hanscom In one of the climactic scenes of the 1917 serial novel Heartless, protagonist Yi Hyŏngsik exhorts his fellow travelers to go abroad, study, and return to strengthen the incipient Korean nation with their knowledge. “Science! Science!” Hyŏngsik exclaimed to himself when he returned to the inn and sat down. The three young women looked at Hyŏngsik. “We must first of all give the Korean people science. We must give them knowl- edge.” He stood up clenching his fists, and walked about the room. Commonly referred to as the first modern novel in Korean literary history, Yi Kwangsu’s Heartless culminates—in terms of plot trajectory, character develop- ment, and message—in a declaration of the importance of science to the modern- ization of Korea. As Jongyon Hwang points out in this issue, Yi’s championing of science “earned sympathy from the majority of reformers and educators captured Christopher P. Hanscom is associate professor in the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures at University of California, Los Angeles. He is the author of The Real Modern: Literary Modernism and the Crisis of Representation in Colonial Korea (2013), a study of theories http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Korean Studies Duke University Press

Science and Literature in Korea: An Introduction

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Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by the Trustees of Columbia University in the City of New York
ISSN
0731-1613
eISSN
2158-1665
DOI
10.1215/21581665-6973266
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Science and Literature in Korea: An Introduction Dafna Zur and Christopher P. Hanscom In one of the climactic scenes of the 1917 serial novel Heartless, protagonist Yi Hyŏngsik exhorts his fellow travelers to go abroad, study, and return to strengthen the incipient Korean nation with their knowledge. “Science! Science!” Hyŏngsik exclaimed to himself when he returned to the inn and sat down. The three young women looked at Hyŏngsik. “We must first of all give the Korean people science. We must give them knowl- edge.” He stood up clenching his fists, and walked about the room. Commonly referred to as the first modern novel in Korean literary history, Yi Kwangsu’s Heartless culminates—in terms of plot trajectory, character develop- ment, and message—in a declaration of the importance of science to the modern- ization of Korea. As Jongyon Hwang points out in this issue, Yi’s championing of science “earned sympathy from the majority of reformers and educators captured Christopher P. Hanscom is associate professor in the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures at University of California, Los Angeles. He is the author of The Real Modern: Literary Modernism and the Crisis of Representation in Colonial Korea (2013), a study of theories

Journal

Journal of Korean StudiesDuke University Press

Published: Oct 1, 2018

References