Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

SCHENKER'S OCTAVE LINES RECONSIDERED

SCHENKER'S OCTAVE LINES RECONSIDERED Example 1. Free Composition, Figure 27 song by Brahms)—and this analysis has been roundly criticized.7 A good many theorists have been led to conclude that, by the end of his career, Schenker came to prefer leaner, more compact versions of the Ursatz, and that we should follow his lead. Numerous commentators have noted the scarcity of octave lines, and several have speculated at some length about disadvantages or shortcomings that might explain it.8 David Neumeyer’s 1987 article “The Urˆ linie from 8 as a Middleground Phenomenon” begins with a listing of what he calls its “main analytic problems.”9 First among these is the problem of how to provide consonant harmonic support for all of its tones. But counterpointing the entire fundamental line is neither necessary nor desirable at the deepest structural levels: none of Schenker’s illustrations of ˆ ˆ background 5-lines or 8-lines in Free Composition shows every tone of the Urlinie consonantly supported. Figure 11 (shown in Example 2) illustrates unsupported stretches in background octave lines. Middleground settings with two bass arpeggiations are illustrated in Figure 19b (also shown in Example 2), but even here, not every tone of the Urlinie recees harmonic support. There is no http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Music Theory Duke University Press

SCHENKER'S OCTAVE LINES RECONSIDERED

Journal of Music Theory , Volume 43 (1) – Jan 1, 1999

Loading next page...
 
/lp/duke-university-press/schenker-s-octave-lines-reconsidered-iTYvzeWJv1
Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 1999 by Yale University
ISSN
0022-2909
eISSN
1941-7497
DOI
10.1215/00222909-43-1-101
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Example 1. Free Composition, Figure 27 song by Brahms)—and this analysis has been roundly criticized.7 A good many theorists have been led to conclude that, by the end of his career, Schenker came to prefer leaner, more compact versions of the Ursatz, and that we should follow his lead. Numerous commentators have noted the scarcity of octave lines, and several have speculated at some length about disadvantages or shortcomings that might explain it.8 David Neumeyer’s 1987 article “The Urˆ linie from 8 as a Middleground Phenomenon” begins with a listing of what he calls its “main analytic problems.”9 First among these is the problem of how to provide consonant harmonic support for all of its tones. But counterpointing the entire fundamental line is neither necessary nor desirable at the deepest structural levels: none of Schenker’s illustrations of ˆ ˆ background 5-lines or 8-lines in Free Composition shows every tone of the Urlinie consonantly supported. Figure 11 (shown in Example 2) illustrates unsupported stretches in background octave lines. Middleground settings with two bass arpeggiations are illustrated in Figure 19b (also shown in Example 2), but even here, not every tone of the Urlinie recees harmonic support. There is no

Journal

Journal of Music TheoryDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 1999

There are no references for this article.