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Scenes of Misrecognition: Maternal Citizenship in the Age of Transnational Adoption

Scenes of Misrecognition: Maternal Citizenship in the Age of Transnational Adoption positions 8:2 Fall 2000 the process of globalization itself in which transnational adoption becomes a feasible means to form families and speaks to the larger issue of new formations of desire. This is perhaps all the more reason to recognize that parents who participate in Internet discussions may thereby well get pulled into articulating thoughts they may not otherwise express. This essay must therefore limit itself to excavating these discussions as a specific discursive frame on transnational parenting, rather than presuming to represent the sentiments of adoptive parents more generally. Yet the necessity of such an acknowledgment leads us irrevocably to the question of subjectivity itself, as a historically contingent process irreducibly imbricated with the materiality of communication and how this may be transforming in the age of “web-based modes of knowing.”1 I have organized this essay around a set of issues that tended to recur in discussion lists over a period of about two years. One of the most compelling of these is the importance of constructing a cultural identity for the Asian adoptee, an issue that absorbs parents both on and off the web. The politics of race identity in contemporary U.S. society is what ultimately http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png positions asia critique Duke University Press

Scenes of Misrecognition: Maternal Citizenship in the Age of Transnational Adoption

positions asia critique , Volume 8 (2) – Sep 1, 2000

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2000 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1067-9847
eISSN
1527-8271
DOI
10.1215/10679847-8-2-389
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

positions 8:2 Fall 2000 the process of globalization itself in which transnational adoption becomes a feasible means to form families and speaks to the larger issue of new formations of desire. This is perhaps all the more reason to recognize that parents who participate in Internet discussions may thereby well get pulled into articulating thoughts they may not otherwise express. This essay must therefore limit itself to excavating these discussions as a specific discursive frame on transnational parenting, rather than presuming to represent the sentiments of adoptive parents more generally. Yet the necessity of such an acknowledgment leads us irrevocably to the question of subjectivity itself, as a historically contingent process irreducibly imbricated with the materiality of communication and how this may be transforming in the age of “web-based modes of knowing.”1 I have organized this essay around a set of issues that tended to recur in discussion lists over a period of about two years. One of the most compelling of these is the importance of constructing a cultural identity for the Asian adoptee, an issue that absorbs parents both on and off the web. The politics of race identity in contemporary U.S. society is what ultimately

Journal

positions asia critiqueDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 2000

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