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ROUSSEAU, RAMEAU, AND ENHARMONIC FURIES IN THE FRENCH ENLIGHTENMENT

ROUSSEAU, RAMEAU, AND ENHARMONIC FURIES IN THE FRENCH ENLIGHTENMENT Example 1. From Gluck, ed Euridice, act II, scene 1: Orpheus placates the Furies passage at the keyboard under his guidance, the aging Rousseau offered one final reflection on the old battles and the chief preoccupations of music theory of his age. The scene that so captivated Rousseau was the opening scene of act II, in which Orpheus, having ventured into Hades, pleads with the furies for mercy.2 With his lyre and his supplicating song, Orpheus gradually 142 Example 1 (continued) succeeds in appeasing them. This crucial point in the story is, of course, the moment of truth in any musical work on the Orpheus myth: Orpheus on stage gives a practical demonstration of music’s power to move some of the most terrifying creatures that Greek mythology could dream up, while at the same time the no less daunting task of the composer is to prove the same to his skeptical audiences and to lend credence to the 143 to se il mio bar - ba - ro do - lor ! Fu - rie, lar - ve, I & Ch. (f ) Nò ! Nò ! om bre sde - gno - se ! Vi ren - http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Music Theory Duke University Press

ROUSSEAU, RAMEAU, AND ENHARMONIC FURIES IN THE FRENCH ENLIGHTENMENT

Journal of Music Theory , Volume 49 (1) – Jan 1, 2005

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2005 by Yale University
ISSN
0022-2909
eISSN
1941-7497
DOI
10.1215/00222909-2007-004
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Example 1. From Gluck, ed Euridice, act II, scene 1: Orpheus placates the Furies passage at the keyboard under his guidance, the aging Rousseau offered one final reflection on the old battles and the chief preoccupations of music theory of his age. The scene that so captivated Rousseau was the opening scene of act II, in which Orpheus, having ventured into Hades, pleads with the furies for mercy.2 With his lyre and his supplicating song, Orpheus gradually 142 Example 1 (continued) succeeds in appeasing them. This crucial point in the story is, of course, the moment of truth in any musical work on the Orpheus myth: Orpheus on stage gives a practical demonstration of music’s power to move some of the most terrifying creatures that Greek mythology could dream up, while at the same time the no less daunting task of the composer is to prove the same to his skeptical audiences and to lend credence to the 143 to se il mio bar - ba - ro do - lor ! Fu - rie, lar - ve, I & Ch. (f ) Nò ! Nò ! om bre sde - gno - se ! Vi ren -

Journal

Journal of Music TheoryDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2005

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