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Rot

Rot Downloaded from http://read.dukeupress.edu/environmental-humanities/article-pdf/8/2/235/409403/235Lorimer.pdf by DEEPDYVE INC user on 31 March 2022 LIVING LEXICON F O R T HE E N VIRONME N TA L H U M AN IT IES JAMIE LORIMER School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford, UK first got acquainted with rot and its possibilities in a graveyard in South London. This I Gothic Victorian churchyard was especially rotten, with its old trees, broken tombs, and neglected bodies. Foraying into the worlds of ecologists and conservationists, I learned that, yes, rot is about death, but it also speaks of life. Spending time with enthu- siasts, I developed affections for rot. I learned of cycles, of the regenerative power of rot to compost and provision. Our special interest was deadwood insects—busy, vital decomposers that break down fallen trees. The stag beetle was our talisman minibeast (fig. 1). Britain’s largest insect: a charismatic flagship for a neglected ark of rotten creepy-crawlies. Underman- aged graveyards had emerged as stag beetle hotspots, and we were there to count the beetles, to put decay on the map, and to help foment popular support for rot. We wanted to rewild urban parks and gardens, offering aesthetic stag beetle nesting boxes, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environmental Humanities Duke University Press

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Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Jamie Lorimer
ISSN
2201-1919
eISSN
2201-1919
DOI
10.1215/22011919-3664333
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Downloaded from http://read.dukeupress.edu/environmental-humanities/article-pdf/8/2/235/409403/235Lorimer.pdf by DEEPDYVE INC user on 31 March 2022 LIVING LEXICON F O R T HE E N VIRONME N TA L H U M AN IT IES JAMIE LORIMER School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford, UK first got acquainted with rot and its possibilities in a graveyard in South London. This I Gothic Victorian churchyard was especially rotten, with its old trees, broken tombs, and neglected bodies. Foraying into the worlds of ecologists and conservationists, I learned that, yes, rot is about death, but it also speaks of life. Spending time with enthu- siasts, I developed affections for rot. I learned of cycles, of the regenerative power of rot to compost and provision. Our special interest was deadwood insects—busy, vital decomposers that break down fallen trees. The stag beetle was our talisman minibeast (fig. 1). Britain’s largest insect: a charismatic flagship for a neglected ark of rotten creepy-crawlies. Underman- aged graveyards had emerged as stag beetle hotspots, and we were there to count the beetles, to put decay on the map, and to help foment popular support for rot. We wanted to rewild urban parks and gardens, offering aesthetic stag beetle nesting boxes,

Journal

Environmental HumanitiesDuke University Press

Published: Nov 1, 2016

References