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ROSALIA, ALOYSIUS, AND ARCANGELO: A GENEALOGY OF THE SEQUENCE

ROSALIA, ALOYSIUS, AND ARCANGELO: A GENEALOGY OF THE SEQUENCE and change. Sequences can thus be used for a number of rhetorical effects, such as transition and climax, that are unavailable to pattern transpositions. Structurally, sequences (especially those with short patterns) create linear progressions according to Schenkerian analysis. Some features in each of the claims above can be altered without changing underlying properties. For example, the main outlines of sequence structure remain clear even if the pattern is varied or elaborated in repetition, and even if the directional vector is adjusted slightly to avoid voice-leading problems or to create a rhetorical effect. Such alterations became prominent and useful in the nineteenth-century sequence, as Richard Bass has documented (1996). We will take our compositional bearings from the works of Arcangelo Corelli (1653–1713), which are situated at the confluence of various streams of pattern repetition and which formed the background of subsequent developments in instrumental music. As we will see, these streams have headwaters in techniques roughly a century old. Corelli and his contemporaries used these techniques to create new and powerful means of controlling tonal flow. But Corelli made such control, by sequence and other techniques, an explicit (perhaps even the main) feature of his handling of tonal materials, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Music Theory Duke University Press

ROSALIA, ALOYSIUS, AND ARCANGELO: A GENEALOGY OF THE SEQUENCE

Journal of Music Theory , Volume 47 (2) – Jan 1, 2003

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2003 by Yale University
ISSN
0022-2909
eISSN
1941-7497
DOI
10.1215/00222909-47-2-225
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

and change. Sequences can thus be used for a number of rhetorical effects, such as transition and climax, that are unavailable to pattern transpositions. Structurally, sequences (especially those with short patterns) create linear progressions according to Schenkerian analysis. Some features in each of the claims above can be altered without changing underlying properties. For example, the main outlines of sequence structure remain clear even if the pattern is varied or elaborated in repetition, and even if the directional vector is adjusted slightly to avoid voice-leading problems or to create a rhetorical effect. Such alterations became prominent and useful in the nineteenth-century sequence, as Richard Bass has documented (1996). We will take our compositional bearings from the works of Arcangelo Corelli (1653–1713), which are situated at the confluence of various streams of pattern repetition and which formed the background of subsequent developments in instrumental music. As we will see, these streams have headwaters in techniques roughly a century old. Corelli and his contemporaries used these techniques to create new and powerful means of controlling tonal flow. But Corelli made such control, by sequence and other techniques, an explicit (perhaps even the main) feature of his handling of tonal materials,

Journal

Journal of Music TheoryDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2003

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