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Researching in the New Public Access

Researching in the New Public Access ferring information, were simply more comfortable with linear texts. They wanted to learn to write for employers, who, as one student rightly asserted, tend to be more interested in direct, clearly logical presentations of informa- tion than in creative reorderings of it. But I have come to believe that writing hypertext is an important way to learn more practical types of writing. Merely reading nonlinear electronic texts will not reveal this schema of organization. As Kip Strasma (1999: 204) points out, the construction of hypertext is “less technical than textual.” His article is an excellent guide to incorporating non- electronic hypertext into writing classes. However, incorporating electronic hypertext into them is not that hard. Even instructors who fear computer technology can create the hypertext experience with Microsoft Word or with Web-editing tools like Netscape Composer. I no longer worry that using hypertext writing in my composition classes will detract from their purpose. In fact, I intend to find new ways to weave the nonlinear into my teaching. DeWitt, Golson, and Strasma have convinced me that the abstraction inherent in the creation of hypertext and hypertext-like exercises encourages a higher level of audience and textual awareness in students. More significantly, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Pedagogy Duke University Press

Researching in the New Public Access

Pedagogy , Volume 2 (2) – Apr 1, 2002

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Copyright
© 2002 Duke University Press
ISSN
1531-4200
eISSN
1533-6255
DOI
10.1215/15314200-2-2-257
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ferring information, were simply more comfortable with linear texts. They wanted to learn to write for employers, who, as one student rightly asserted, tend to be more interested in direct, clearly logical presentations of informa- tion than in creative reorderings of it. But I have come to believe that writing hypertext is an important way to learn more practical types of writing. Merely reading nonlinear electronic texts will not reveal this schema of organization. As Kip Strasma (1999: 204) points out, the construction of hypertext is “less technical than textual.” His article is an excellent guide to incorporating non- electronic hypertext into writing classes. However, incorporating electronic hypertext into them is not that hard. Even instructors who fear computer technology can create the hypertext experience with Microsoft Word or with Web-editing tools like Netscape Composer. I no longer worry that using hypertext writing in my composition classes will detract from their purpose. In fact, I intend to find new ways to weave the nonlinear into my teaching. DeWitt, Golson, and Strasma have convinced me that the abstraction inherent in the creation of hypertext and hypertext-like exercises encourages a higher level of audience and textual awareness in students. More significantly,

Journal

PedagogyDuke University Press

Published: Apr 1, 2002

References