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Rembrandt Agonistes

Rembrandt Agonistes Harry Berger, Jr., Fictions of the Pose: Rembrandt Against the Italian Renaissance. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2000. xxi + 624 pp., 32 color plates + 51 halftone ills. Harry Berger’s Fictions of the Pose is a delight to read, but a devil to write about. This is especially true in a review, where the writer is responsible not only for those parts of a book that are of immediate relevance to his or her own research, but for the author’s work as an intricate whole. Having given us a book that is well over six-hundred-pages long and contains some eighty illustrations, Berger has a lot to say; and though style and tone retain a charming lightness and lucidity throughout, the detailed complexity of Berger’s thought is demanding. Fictions of the Pose is a literally monumental accomplishment whose virtues merit a more thorough airing than I can hope to provide here. Long as it is, the following summary must then be read as shamefully abbreviated. Berger’s central theme is “the Rembrandt look, a phrase that denotes “both ” the characteristic appearance of works attributed to (or deattributed from) Rembrandt—the way they look to us—and also the way they ‘look’ http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Comparative Literature Duke University Press

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2003 by University of Oregon
ISSN
0010-4124
eISSN
1945-8517
DOI
10.1215/-55-2-164
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Harry Berger, Jr., Fictions of the Pose: Rembrandt Against the Italian Renaissance. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2000. xxi + 624 pp., 32 color plates + 51 halftone ills. Harry Berger’s Fictions of the Pose is a delight to read, but a devil to write about. This is especially true in a review, where the writer is responsible not only for those parts of a book that are of immediate relevance to his or her own research, but for the author’s work as an intricate whole. Having given us a book that is well over six-hundred-pages long and contains some eighty illustrations, Berger has a lot to say; and though style and tone retain a charming lightness and lucidity throughout, the detailed complexity of Berger’s thought is demanding. Fictions of the Pose is a literally monumental accomplishment whose virtues merit a more thorough airing than I can hope to provide here. Long as it is, the following summary must then be read as shamefully abbreviated. Berger’s central theme is “the Rembrandt look, a phrase that denotes “both ” the characteristic appearance of works attributed to (or deattributed from) Rembrandt—the way they look to us—and also the way they ‘look’

Journal

Comparative LiteratureDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2003

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