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Preface

Preface People in America are as religious today as they ever have been, but religion is far more diffused throughout culture. No longer is there dominant religion or common religious culture based on a master narrative that orders the lives of American citizens. In addition to traditional institutionalized religious belief and practice, religion has become either a private affair manifested in highly particular­ ized forms in individual lives or a public event that has been relo­ cated from the church to the streets, nightclubs, concert coliseums, and music festivals. Religion's relocation to the streets is manifested in marching feet and singing tongues that protest myriad human and political rights issues that are often undergirded by a religious mythology or cosmology. Religion's relocation to the nightclubs in­ cludes the weekly oscillation of secularists to the rite and ritual of the Friday and Saturday night function. Its relocation to concert col­ iseums and music festivals includes weekly, annual, or seasonal ex­ cursions to sacred gathering centers where groups of people find themselves in more comfortable spaces. The purpose of these events is to maintain cultic bonds and to achieve heightened forms of com­ munity that reaffirm mythologies and theologies and generate the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Black Sacred Music Duke University Press

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Copyright
Copyright © 1992 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1043-9455
eISSN
2640-9879
DOI
10.1215/10439455-6.1.v
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

People in America are as religious today as they ever have been, but religion is far more diffused throughout culture. No longer is there dominant religion or common religious culture based on a master narrative that orders the lives of American citizens. In addition to traditional institutionalized religious belief and practice, religion has become either a private affair manifested in highly particular­ ized forms in individual lives or a public event that has been relo­ cated from the church to the streets, nightclubs, concert coliseums, and music festivals. Religion's relocation to the streets is manifested in marching feet and singing tongues that protest myriad human and political rights issues that are often undergirded by a religious mythology or cosmology. Religion's relocation to the nightclubs in­ cludes the weekly oscillation of secularists to the rite and ritual of the Friday and Saturday night function. Its relocation to concert col­ iseums and music festivals includes weekly, annual, or seasonal ex­ cursions to sacred gathering centers where groups of people find themselves in more comfortable spaces. The purpose of these events is to maintain cultic bonds and to achieve heightened forms of com­ munity that reaffirm mythologies and theologies and generate the

Journal

Black Sacred MusicDuke University Press

Published: Mar 1, 1992

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