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Preface

Preface Why do we not simply throw in the towel and give up on the idea of developing a new discipline called theomusicology? Has orthodox academia not rendered its verdict? Has it not done so, for instance, through its rejection of my application in 1991 to procure a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) to hold a conference that I envisioned would be a defining moment in the his­ tory of theomusicology? Had not the peer evaluators for NEH ren­ dered theomusicology a moot idea when they said that the proposal I submitted looked like "a pretty brazen hustle" because in the years since the term theomusicology had been coined the idea of this being a new discipline had "failed to gain the approval of scholars in musi­ cology or ethnomusicology"? Another peer evaluator of my proposal argued that a thorough review of scholarship in related fields failed to show that a new musicological discipline is needed. The evaluator went on to say that the field of ethnomusicology already embraces interdisciplinary studies of music and culture and that it cannot be said that ethnomusicologists neglect the sacred dimensions of music or are unwilling to consult scholars of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Black Sacred Music Duke University Press

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Copyright
Copyright © 1994 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1043-9455
eISSN
2640-9879
DOI
10.1215/10439455-8.1.v
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Why do we not simply throw in the towel and give up on the idea of developing a new discipline called theomusicology? Has orthodox academia not rendered its verdict? Has it not done so, for instance, through its rejection of my application in 1991 to procure a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) to hold a conference that I envisioned would be a defining moment in the his­ tory of theomusicology? Had not the peer evaluators for NEH ren­ dered theomusicology a moot idea when they said that the proposal I submitted looked like "a pretty brazen hustle" because in the years since the term theomusicology had been coined the idea of this being a new discipline had "failed to gain the approval of scholars in musi­ cology or ethnomusicology"? Another peer evaluator of my proposal argued that a thorough review of scholarship in related fields failed to show that a new musicological discipline is needed. The evaluator went on to say that the field of ethnomusicology already embraces interdisciplinary studies of music and culture and that it cannot be said that ethnomusicologists neglect the sacred dimensions of music or are unwilling to consult scholars of

Journal

Black Sacred MusicDuke University Press

Published: Mar 1, 1994

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