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Preface

Preface Prelate Theomusicology-musicology as a theologically informed disci­ pline-is a musicological method for theologizing about the sacred (the religious/churched), the secular (the theistic unreligious/un­ churched), and the profane (the atheistic/irreligious)-including sa­ cred and nonsacred music functioning as theomusicotherapy in church and community-principally incorporating methods bor­ rowed from anthropology, sociology, psychology, and philosophy. Theomusicology uses the social sciences to procure empirical data which it then subjects to theological interpretation. Where theology proper is unequipped to critique the irreligious, theomusicology em­ ploys philosophy inasmuch as this discipline has given extensive thought to the effect of music on the human psyche. The first part of the following introduction, "Philosophical Pro­ legomena to Theomusicological Thematizing of the Nonsacred," will examine these two approaches to theomusicology in greater detail, and the second part, "God in Secular Music Culture: The Theodicy of the Blues as the Paradigm of Proof," will argue the thesis through a detailed examination of the blues. In fine, while theology is equipped to engage in an exegesis of the religious and unreligious creators and consumers of popular music by examining the theologi­ cal meaning of their kinetic and linguistic behavior amid the musical event, philosophical theology is equipped to engage in religiophilo­ http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Black Sacred Music Duke University Press

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Copyright
Copyright © 1989 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1043-9455
eISSN
2640-9879
DOI
10.1215/10439455-3.2.v
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Prelate Theomusicology-musicology as a theologically informed disci­ pline-is a musicological method for theologizing about the sacred (the religious/churched), the secular (the theistic unreligious/un­ churched), and the profane (the atheistic/irreligious)-including sa­ cred and nonsacred music functioning as theomusicotherapy in church and community-principally incorporating methods bor­ rowed from anthropology, sociology, psychology, and philosophy. Theomusicology uses the social sciences to procure empirical data which it then subjects to theological interpretation. Where theology proper is unequipped to critique the irreligious, theomusicology em­ ploys philosophy inasmuch as this discipline has given extensive thought to the effect of music on the human psyche. The first part of the following introduction, "Philosophical Pro­ legomena to Theomusicological Thematizing of the Nonsacred," will examine these two approaches to theomusicology in greater detail, and the second part, "God in Secular Music Culture: The Theodicy of the Blues as the Paradigm of Proof," will argue the thesis through a detailed examination of the blues. In fine, while theology is equipped to engage in an exegesis of the religious and unreligious creators and consumers of popular music by examining the theologi­ cal meaning of their kinetic and linguistic behavior amid the musical event, philosophical theology is equipped to engage in religiophilo­

Journal

Black Sacred MusicDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 1989

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