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Poetry and Its Others: News, Prayer, Song, and the Dialogue of Genres

Poetry and Its Others: News, Prayer, Song, and the Dialogue of Genres Comparative Literature COMPARATIVE LITERATURE / 456 Cathy Park Hong, and Paul Muldoon). Every chapter ends with a version of the following passage, which concludes chapter 3: Whether or not an individual poet is a believer, the secular cast of modernity has made prayer one of the creations that the modern literary mind turns to and examines, poetically encasing the devotional sister genre in highly wrought verbal chambers that both illuminate and distort it. Modern and contemporary poets have embraced but bracketed prayer, echoed but inverted it, in poems that may be less prayers than metaprayers, less addresses to the divine than images of such address, less petitions of the supernatural than self-scrutinizing commentaries on the figurative, rhetorical, and theological underpinnings of such petition. Even as modern and contemporary poetry has been strengthened by its intercourse with prayer, as also with the news, the law, theory, and the novel, it has jealously defended its distinctive freedoms, its varied forms of playfulness, its self-reflexive scrutiny, its wayward imaginings and linguistic exuberance. (183) The Edgar F. Shannon Professor of English at the University of Virginia and author of four other monographs, Ramazani has recently made several contributions to Oxford Handbooks or http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Comparative Literature Duke University Press

Poetry and Its Others: News, Prayer, Song, and the Dialogue of Genres

Comparative Literature , Volume 67 (4) – Dec 1, 2015

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Duke Univ Press
ISSN
0010-4124
eISSN
1945-8517
DOI
10.1215/00104124-3327703
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Abstract

Comparative Literature COMPARATIVE LITERATURE / 456 Cathy Park Hong, and Paul Muldoon). Every chapter ends with a version of the following passage, which concludes chapter 3: Whether or not an individual poet is a believer, the secular cast of modernity has made prayer one of the creations that the modern literary mind turns to and examines, poetically encasing the devotional sister genre in highly wrought verbal chambers that both illuminate and distort it. Modern and contemporary poets have embraced but bracketed prayer, echoed but inverted it, in poems that may be less prayers than metaprayers, less addresses to the divine than images of such address, less petitions of the supernatural than self-scrutinizing commentaries on the figurative, rhetorical, and theological underpinnings of such petition. Even as modern and contemporary poetry has been strengthened by its intercourse with prayer, as also with the news, the law, theory, and the novel, it has jealously defended its distinctive freedoms, its varied forms of playfulness, its self-reflexive scrutiny, its wayward imaginings and linguistic exuberance. (183) The Edgar F. Shannon Professor of English at the University of Virginia and author of four other monographs, Ramazani has recently made several contributions to Oxford Handbooks or

Journal

Comparative LiteratureDuke University Press

Published: Dec 1, 2015

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