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PARTITION LATTICES IN TWELVE-TONE MUSIC: AN INTRODUCTION

PARTITION LATTICES IN TWELVE-TONE MUSIC: AN INTRODUCTION pc partitions; we shall forego, however, the somewhat lengthy demonstration of how that number is determined.6 In analytical applications, we shall use partitions to model and explore different segmentations of aggregates in twelve-tone musical textures: if two pcs x and y are in the same (analytical) segment, they will belong to the same partition memberset. Vice versa, we can explore the analytical relevance of a given partition in some twelve-tone composition by examining how it segments an aggregate (or aggregates) in specific passages. We can segment a musical texture, or evaluate a segmentation that is induced by a partition, by examining whether pitches (representing pitch classes) in a segment share one or more of the following kinds of attributes: duration, attack point, register (registral tessitura) or voice-leading strand membership, serial or lynear derivation, articulation, dynamic level, instrumental identity or timbre in general, formal location (at the beginning, middle, or ending of a phrase or larger section of continuity), and so forth. In later analytical commentary, we shall often not explicitly cite the pertinent segmentation criteria; but those criteria will in general be reasonably clear within the context of the commentary. We shall not explore here the interesting but http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Music Theory Duke University Press

PARTITION LATTICES IN TWELVE-TONE MUSIC: AN INTRODUCTION

Journal of Music Theory , Volume 43 (1) – Jan 1, 1999

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 1999 by Yale University
ISSN
0022-2909
eISSN
1941-7497
DOI
10.1215/00222909-43-1-21
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

pc partitions; we shall forego, however, the somewhat lengthy demonstration of how that number is determined.6 In analytical applications, we shall use partitions to model and explore different segmentations of aggregates in twelve-tone musical textures: if two pcs x and y are in the same (analytical) segment, they will belong to the same partition memberset. Vice versa, we can explore the analytical relevance of a given partition in some twelve-tone composition by examining how it segments an aggregate (or aggregates) in specific passages. We can segment a musical texture, or evaluate a segmentation that is induced by a partition, by examining whether pitches (representing pitch classes) in a segment share one or more of the following kinds of attributes: duration, attack point, register (registral tessitura) or voice-leading strand membership, serial or lynear derivation, articulation, dynamic level, instrumental identity or timbre in general, formal location (at the beginning, middle, or ending of a phrase or larger section of continuity), and so forth. In later analytical commentary, we shall often not explicitly cite the pertinent segmentation criteria; but those criteria will in general be reasonably clear within the context of the commentary. We shall not explore here the interesting but

Journal

Journal of Music TheoryDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 1999

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