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Paradiso ma non troppo: The Place of the Lyric Dante in the Late Cantos of Ezra Pound

Paradiso ma non troppo: The Place of the Lyric Dante in the Late Cantos of Ezra Pound 1 Key texts here include Pearlman, Wilhelm, and Sicari. Stoicheff consistently refers to the Late Cantos as “The Cantos’ paradise” (30, 101, passim). 2 See Stoicheff for the most complete discussion of the complex history that led to Drafts & Fragments and the multiple ends of the poem. Bush also has a good discussion of the textual complexity of Drafts & Fragments (128-33). 3 See “Dante’s Hell and Pound’s Paradiso,” Imitating the Italians (esp. 116-19 and 209-17), and “Why the Commedia Is Not the Model for the Cantos and What Is.” 4 Citations from The Cantos of Ezra Pound are by canto number and then page, as is customary in Pound scholarship. COMPARATIVE LITERATURE /46 it in the direction of a more open form representing the complexity of the modern world. However, I now believe that both of the options I have just outlined—the option of similitude or the option of dissimilitude—get the relation between Dante and Pound wrong because both assume that the relevant issue is the formal resemblance between the Commedia and The Cantos. Critics have focused on the question of form because it seems obvious to everyone that Pound’s paradiso is not like Dante’s in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Comparative Literature Duke University Press

Paradiso ma non troppo: The Place of the Lyric Dante in the Late Cantos of Ezra Pound

Comparative Literature , Volume 57 (1) – Jan 1, 2005

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2005 by University of Oregon
ISSN
0010-4124
eISSN
1945-8517
DOI
10.1215/-57-1-45
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 Key texts here include Pearlman, Wilhelm, and Sicari. Stoicheff consistently refers to the Late Cantos as “The Cantos’ paradise” (30, 101, passim). 2 See Stoicheff for the most complete discussion of the complex history that led to Drafts & Fragments and the multiple ends of the poem. Bush also has a good discussion of the textual complexity of Drafts & Fragments (128-33). 3 See “Dante’s Hell and Pound’s Paradiso,” Imitating the Italians (esp. 116-19 and 209-17), and “Why the Commedia Is Not the Model for the Cantos and What Is.” 4 Citations from The Cantos of Ezra Pound are by canto number and then page, as is customary in Pound scholarship. COMPARATIVE LITERATURE /46 it in the direction of a more open form representing the complexity of the modern world. However, I now believe that both of the options I have just outlined—the option of similitude or the option of dissimilitude—get the relation between Dante and Pound wrong because both assume that the relevant issue is the formal resemblance between the Commedia and The Cantos. Critics have focused on the question of form because it seems obvious to everyone that Pound’s paradiso is not like Dante’s in

Journal

Comparative LiteratureDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2005

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