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Our Lady of the Nations: Apparitions of Mary in Twentieth-Century Catholic Europe by Chris Maunder

Our Lady of the Nations: Apparitions of Mary in Twentieth-Century Catholic Europe by Chris Maunder glimpse of what might have been given to us on Romantic poetry itself had Butler been able to complete her plan. — Claude Rawson doi 10.1215/0961754X-4254120 Chris Maunder, Our Lady of the Nations: Apparitions of Mary in Twentieth- Century Catholic Europe (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016), 256 pp. The scholarly and devotional literature on modern Marian apparitions has grown impressively in the last thirty years. This book provides a useful overview of twentieth- century cases, from Fatima (1917) to Medjurgorje (1980s), addressing questions such as why these apparitions took place where and when they did (the theme of crisis to the fore), the identity of the seers (mostly young and female), community reactions, and the response of the church. Most of Maunder’s chap - ters are in the range of ten to twelve pages, a little too short to build an argument, but he is a judicious guide to the main themes and his book can be recommended as an introduction. — David Blackbourn doi 10.1215/0961754X-4254132 Christopher de Hamel, Meetings with Remarkable Manuscripts (London: Penguin, 2016), 640 pp. De Hamel’s book is a series of meetings or rather interviews with twelve illumi- nated manuscripts that range in date from the late sixth to the early sixteenth cen - tury; it is generously illustrated and, although it is a heavy, fat book to hold, it is easy to read. De Hamel takes the reader along with him to various libraries in the northern hemisphere (from Dublin to St. Petersburg, New York to Los Angeles) and explains who made the manuscripts, where, when, and for whom, wherein lies their signic fi ance, and what is known of their later history. The tone of the book is relaxed, authoritative, and personal: addresses to an unseen audience (“you”) are matched by regular imperatives (“Listen carefully,” “Note that,” “Remember also”). The delivery is as carefully modulated as what the author reveals about his friends and himself. His “wet woolly hat” makes a cameo appearance at Leiden. — H. R. Woudhuysen doi 10.1215/0961754X-4254144 Downloaded from https://read.dukeupress.edu/common-knowledge/article-pdf/24/1/170/518243/0240170.pdf by DEEPDYVE INC user on 22 August 2019 C OM MO N K N O W L E D G E 17 0 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Common Knowledge Duke University Press

Our Lady of the Nations: Apparitions of Mary in Twentieth-Century Catholic Europe by Chris Maunder

Common Knowledge , Volume 24 (1) – Jan 1, 2018

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Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Duke University Press
ISSN
0961-754X
eISSN
1538-4578
DOI
10.1215/0961754X-4254132
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Abstract

glimpse of what might have been given to us on Romantic poetry itself had Butler been able to complete her plan. — Claude Rawson doi 10.1215/0961754X-4254120 Chris Maunder, Our Lady of the Nations: Apparitions of Mary in Twentieth- Century Catholic Europe (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016), 256 pp. The scholarly and devotional literature on modern Marian apparitions has grown impressively in the last thirty years. This book provides a useful overview of twentieth- century cases, from Fatima (1917) to Medjurgorje (1980s), addressing questions such as why these apparitions took place where and when they did (the theme of crisis to the fore), the identity of the seers (mostly young and female), community reactions, and the response of the church. Most of Maunder’s chap - ters are in the range of ten to twelve pages, a little too short to build an argument, but he is a judicious guide to the main themes and his book can be recommended as an introduction. — David Blackbourn doi 10.1215/0961754X-4254132 Christopher de Hamel, Meetings with Remarkable Manuscripts (London: Penguin, 2016), 640 pp. De Hamel’s book is a series of meetings or rather interviews with twelve illumi- nated manuscripts that range in date from the late sixth to the early sixteenth cen - tury; it is generously illustrated and, although it is a heavy, fat book to hold, it is easy to read. De Hamel takes the reader along with him to various libraries in the northern hemisphere (from Dublin to St. Petersburg, New York to Los Angeles) and explains who made the manuscripts, where, when, and for whom, wherein lies their signic fi ance, and what is known of their later history. The tone of the book is relaxed, authoritative, and personal: addresses to an unseen audience (“you”) are matched by regular imperatives (“Listen carefully,” “Note that,” “Remember also”). The delivery is as carefully modulated as what the author reveals about his friends and himself. His “wet woolly hat” makes a cameo appearance at Leiden. — H. R. Woudhuysen doi 10.1215/0961754X-4254144 Downloaded from https://read.dukeupress.edu/common-knowledge/article-pdf/24/1/170/518243/0240170.pdf by DEEPDYVE INC user on 22 August 2019 C OM MO N K N O W L E D G E 17 0

Journal

Common KnowledgeDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2018

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