Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Opening a Minor Genre of Resistance in Reform China: Scream, Dream, and Transgression in a Workplace

Opening a Minor Genre of Resistance in Reform China: Scream, Dream, and Transgression in a Workplace positions 8:2 Fall 2000 scream and dream in the workplace. I had moved to Yan’s room because there had been complaints of her scream late every night in the dormitory. Eight people crowded into one small room, less than one hundred square feet, sharing four double-decked iron beds. This was, in short, a normal dormitory setting in the Shenzhen Special Economic Zone in China. Relations among the girls and women in this room were tense, not only from the lack of space and privacy, but also because of Yan’s screams, which frightened her roommates and disturbed their sleep. I suffered too, not so much from having my sleep disturbed, but from my difficulty in grasping, understanding, and then speaking for the scream. Yan herself seemed to suffer the least; she woke up to consciousness at a particular moment amid her screams and then fell asleep again immediately. That shrieking voice was followed by a dreadful silence; after a week in the room, I was perplexed by and anxious to understand the scream. The silence did not bring me to a standstill; rather, it opened up the possibilities of new experiences of human suffering and transgression at that very http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png positions asia critique Duke University Press

Opening a Minor Genre of Resistance in Reform China: Scream, Dream, and Transgression in a Workplace

positions asia critique , Volume 8 (2) – Sep 1, 2000

Loading next page...
 
/lp/duke-university-press/opening-a-minor-genre-of-resistance-in-reform-china-scream-dream-and-VbDAMXILMz
Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2000 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1067-9847
eISSN
1527-8271
DOI
10.1215/10679847-8-2-531
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

positions 8:2 Fall 2000 scream and dream in the workplace. I had moved to Yan’s room because there had been complaints of her scream late every night in the dormitory. Eight people crowded into one small room, less than one hundred square feet, sharing four double-decked iron beds. This was, in short, a normal dormitory setting in the Shenzhen Special Economic Zone in China. Relations among the girls and women in this room were tense, not only from the lack of space and privacy, but also because of Yan’s screams, which frightened her roommates and disturbed their sleep. I suffered too, not so much from having my sleep disturbed, but from my difficulty in grasping, understanding, and then speaking for the scream. Yan herself seemed to suffer the least; she woke up to consciousness at a particular moment amid her screams and then fell asleep again immediately. That shrieking voice was followed by a dreadful silence; after a week in the room, I was perplexed by and anxious to understand the scream. The silence did not bring me to a standstill; rather, it opened up the possibilities of new experiences of human suffering and transgression at that very

Journal

positions asia critiqueDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 2000

There are no references for this article.