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On Syndemics and Social Change

On Syndemics and Social Change Downloaded from http://read.dukeupress.edu/english-language-notes/article-pdf/60/1/184/1507966/184davis.pdf by DEEPDYVE INC user on 12 May 2022 Of Note ............................................................................................................................................................................. cynthia j. davis hould we view the COVID-19 pandemic as an inflection point or as more of the S same? Has the newly resurgent pandemic only deepened entrenched socioeco- nomic divisions or shone a light on them so glaring that structural change ensues? In what ways has the coronavirus sharpened established biomedical and geopolitical borders, even as, qua pandemic, it inevitably crossed them? And to what extent have the devastating effects of this first truly global pandemic been compounded by con- temporaneous crises that made 2020 an annus horribilis for so many, although notably not all, of us? What we have all been living through (same storm, different boats) since late December 2019 deserves to be called a syndemic, a term originally introduced by the medical anthropologist Merrill Singer to designate two or more aggregated disease clusters in a given population but now used more loosely to describe any “fractured, stratified convergence of catastrophes.”1 Three 2020 jour- nal publications—Anjuli Fatima Raza Kolb’s “Paravictorianism: Mary Shelley and Viral Sovereignty,” Walter D. Mignolo’s “The Logic of the In-visible: Decolonial Reflections on the Change of Epoch,” and a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png English Language Notes Duke University Press

On Syndemics and Social Change

English Language Notes , Volume 60 (1) – Apr 1, 2022

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Copyright
Copyright © 2022 Regents of the University of Colorado
ISSN
0013-8282
eISSN
2573-3575
DOI
10.1215/00138282-9560309
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Downloaded from http://read.dukeupress.edu/english-language-notes/article-pdf/60/1/184/1507966/184davis.pdf by DEEPDYVE INC user on 12 May 2022 Of Note ............................................................................................................................................................................. cynthia j. davis hould we view the COVID-19 pandemic as an inflection point or as more of the S same? Has the newly resurgent pandemic only deepened entrenched socioeco- nomic divisions or shone a light on them so glaring that structural change ensues? In what ways has the coronavirus sharpened established biomedical and geopolitical borders, even as, qua pandemic, it inevitably crossed them? And to what extent have the devastating effects of this first truly global pandemic been compounded by con- temporaneous crises that made 2020 an annus horribilis for so many, although notably not all, of us? What we have all been living through (same storm, different boats) since late December 2019 deserves to be called a syndemic, a term originally introduced by the medical anthropologist Merrill Singer to designate two or more aggregated disease clusters in a given population but now used more loosely to describe any “fractured, stratified convergence of catastrophes.”1 Three 2020 jour- nal publications—Anjuli Fatima Raza Kolb’s “Paravictorianism: Mary Shelley and Viral Sovereignty,” Walter D. Mignolo’s “The Logic of the In-visible: Decolonial Reflections on the Change of Epoch,” and a

Journal

English Language NotesDuke University Press

Published: Apr 1, 2022

References