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Northbound Colonialism: A Politics of Post-PC Hong Kong

Northbound Colonialism: A Politics of Post-PC Hong Kong positions 8:1 Spring 2000 going to change. With the hustle and bustle of the handover becoming an event of the past, I, like many people traveling from Hong Kong, have often been asked the same questions: What is Hong Kong like now? Is there any change? Do you still have freedom of speech? Is there any state control in the universities or censorship in the mass media? The answer I always give to these well-intended questions is, There is nothing noticeable on the surface — except that the TV and radio news (wo)men no longer call Jiang Zemin the Chinese president but, directly and with an odd effect, President Jiang. Small but significant, this apparently Hong Kong/Chinese style of political correctness in newspeak can be discerned in any updated reportage of post1997 Hong Kong. If it does not exactly answer the usual questions coming from ingenuous presumptions about political control, or satisfy curiosity about the Chinese Communist Party’s (CCP) alleged rabbit in the hat, it can at least provide clues about local politics operating on a more mundane, discursive, and everyday level. Blessed is the fact that, unlike their colleagues in the mainland’s CCTV, our journalists still do http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png positions asia critique Duke University Press

Northbound Colonialism: A Politics of Post-PC Hong Kong

positions asia critique , Volume 8 (1) – Mar 1, 2000

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2000 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1067-9847
eISSN
1527-8271
DOI
10.1215/10679847-8-1-201
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

positions 8:1 Spring 2000 going to change. With the hustle and bustle of the handover becoming an event of the past, I, like many people traveling from Hong Kong, have often been asked the same questions: What is Hong Kong like now? Is there any change? Do you still have freedom of speech? Is there any state control in the universities or censorship in the mass media? The answer I always give to these well-intended questions is, There is nothing noticeable on the surface — except that the TV and radio news (wo)men no longer call Jiang Zemin the Chinese president but, directly and with an odd effect, President Jiang. Small but significant, this apparently Hong Kong/Chinese style of political correctness in newspeak can be discerned in any updated reportage of post1997 Hong Kong. If it does not exactly answer the usual questions coming from ingenuous presumptions about political control, or satisfy curiosity about the Chinese Communist Party’s (CCP) alleged rabbit in the hat, it can at least provide clues about local politics operating on a more mundane, discursive, and everyday level. Blessed is the fact that, unlike their colleagues in the mainland’s CCTV, our journalists still do

Journal

positions asia critiqueDuke University Press

Published: Mar 1, 2000

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