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“No Enemy, No Betrayer, No bearded Torturer”: the Death of God, the Holocaust, and Existentialism in Wallant's The Human Season

“No Enemy, No Betrayer, No bearded Torturer”: the Death of God, the Holocaust, and Existentialism... S e p te m b e r 2005 63 “N O ENEMY, N O BETRAYER, N O BEARDED TO R TU R ER ”: T H E DEATH O F GOD, T H E HOLOCAUST, AND EXISTENTIALISM IN WALLANT’S THE H U M A N SEASON With my last breath I will curse you. E .L . W a l l a n t 1 I n t r o d u c t i o n In 1966, Rabbi R ichard Rubenstein burst u p o n the theologi­ cal scene with his controversial After Auschwitz: Radical Theology and Contemporary Judaism, which argued that, after the Holocaust, it becam e impossible to believe in th e beneficent, covenantal God o f Judaism .2 R ubenstein’s iconoclastic succès de scandale sprung from two historical evolutions th a t were in c o rp o ra ted into his the­ ology: the increasing visibility o f th e H olocaust in A m erican life, a n d the p o p u la r fad o f F rench existentialism, which provided the basis for his death-of-God thinking.3 Edward Lewis W allant’s The H uman Season (1960) is http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png English Language Notes Duke University Press

“No Enemy, No Betrayer, No bearded Torturer”: the Death of God, the Holocaust, and Existentialism in Wallant's The Human Season

English Language Notes , Volume 43 (1) – Sep 1, 2005

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Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Regents of the University of Colorado
ISSN
0013-8282
eISSN
2573-3575
DOI
10.1215/00138282-43.1.63
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

S e p te m b e r 2005 63 “N O ENEMY, N O BETRAYER, N O BEARDED TO R TU R ER ”: T H E DEATH O F GOD, T H E HOLOCAUST, AND EXISTENTIALISM IN WALLANT’S THE H U M A N SEASON With my last breath I will curse you. E .L . W a l l a n t 1 I n t r o d u c t i o n In 1966, Rabbi R ichard Rubenstein burst u p o n the theologi­ cal scene with his controversial After Auschwitz: Radical Theology and Contemporary Judaism, which argued that, after the Holocaust, it becam e impossible to believe in th e beneficent, covenantal God o f Judaism .2 R ubenstein’s iconoclastic succès de scandale sprung from two historical evolutions th a t were in c o rp o ra ted into his the­ ology: the increasing visibility o f th e H olocaust in A m erican life, a n d the p o p u la r fad o f F rench existentialism, which provided the basis for his death-of-God thinking.3 Edward Lewis W allant’s The H uman Season (1960) is

Journal

English Language NotesDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 2005

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