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Negro Music of the Present

Negro Music of the Present Negro Music ol the Present On page seventy-two of his "American Masters of Painting," Mr. Charles H. Caffin makes the following statement: "So far as could from the showing made by American painters at previous be judged expositions, they were but reflecting the influences of Paris, or of German and English painting." And then he asks this pertinent question, "Was there, in fact, as distinguished from art in America, any American art?" Turning to the realm of music, one finds an analogous situation; for, until very recently, music in America was but the reflection of music in Europe . Many of the works by American composers were even named in a foreign language, which shows how extensive was the disregard for things of native origin. If there was, in fact, any real American music as distinguished from music in America, it had as a foundation the songs of popular minstrels, including those of Ste­ phen Foster, the ditties sung in colored operas, and the farcical "coon songs" of the vaudeville stage- music which, while being dis­ tinctive enough, was too trivial in intent and effect to constitute anything worthy of the name of "art." As for Negro composers, since http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Black Sacred Music Duke University Press

Negro Music of the Present

Black Sacred Music , Volume 5 (2) – Sep 1, 1991

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Copyright
Copyright © 1991 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1043-9455
eISSN
2640-9879
DOI
10.1215/10439455-5.2.42
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Negro Music ol the Present On page seventy-two of his "American Masters of Painting," Mr. Charles H. Caffin makes the following statement: "So far as could from the showing made by American painters at previous be judged expositions, they were but reflecting the influences of Paris, or of German and English painting." And then he asks this pertinent question, "Was there, in fact, as distinguished from art in America, any American art?" Turning to the realm of music, one finds an analogous situation; for, until very recently, music in America was but the reflection of music in Europe . Many of the works by American composers were even named in a foreign language, which shows how extensive was the disregard for things of native origin. If there was, in fact, any real American music as distinguished from music in America, it had as a foundation the songs of popular minstrels, including those of Ste­ phen Foster, the ditties sung in colored operas, and the farcical "coon songs" of the vaudeville stage- music which, while being dis­ tinctive enough, was too trivial in intent and effect to constitute anything worthy of the name of "art." As for Negro composers, since

Journal

Black Sacred MusicDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 1991

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