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Nation of Islam Ideology in the Rap of Public Enemy

Nation of Islam Ideology in the Rap of Public Enemy Nation ol Islam Ideology in the Rap ol Public Enemy William Eric Perkins The racialism of the Negro is no limitation or reservation with respect to American life ; it is only a constructive effort to build the obstructions in the stream of his progress into an efficient dam of social energy and power.­ Alain Locke, The New Negro (1925) The current national debates on rap music and its social, political, and sexual influences have been dominated by a discourse trapped in the ideology of post-Reagan America . Cultural and music critics, lawyers, politicians, and anachronistic clerics have belittled, indeed castigated, the genre of rap, treating it as a cancer eating away at the already declining moral fiber of American youth, black and white. As in the 1950s with the emergence of white rock-and-roll, the estab­ lishment looks upon rap as the new subversion, the "devil's music" of the 1990s. While the debate on censorship in the arts has the rap music of 2 Live Crew as its cornerstone, the political rappers have been pushed into the background. Attacked, criticized, even banished, Public En­ emy nevertheless continues to enjoy phenomenal success. Led by the astute rapper Chuck D (Carlton http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Black Sacred Music Duke University Press

Nation of Islam Ideology in the Rap of Public Enemy

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Copyright
Copyright © 1991 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1043-9455
eISSN
2640-9879
DOI
10.1215/10439455-5.1.41
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Nation ol Islam Ideology in the Rap ol Public Enemy William Eric Perkins The racialism of the Negro is no limitation or reservation with respect to American life ; it is only a constructive effort to build the obstructions in the stream of his progress into an efficient dam of social energy and power.­ Alain Locke, The New Negro (1925) The current national debates on rap music and its social, political, and sexual influences have been dominated by a discourse trapped in the ideology of post-Reagan America . Cultural and music critics, lawyers, politicians, and anachronistic clerics have belittled, indeed castigated, the genre of rap, treating it as a cancer eating away at the already declining moral fiber of American youth, black and white. As in the 1950s with the emergence of white rock-and-roll, the estab­ lishment looks upon rap as the new subversion, the "devil's music" of the 1990s. While the debate on censorship in the arts has the rap music of 2 Live Crew as its cornerstone, the political rappers have been pushed into the background. Attacked, criticized, even banished, Public En­ emy nevertheless continues to enjoy phenomenal success. Led by the astute rapper Chuck D (Carlton

Journal

Black Sacred MusicDuke University Press

Published: Mar 1, 1991

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