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Musicology as a Theologically Informed Discipline

Musicology as a Theologically Informed Discipline Musicology as a Theologically Informed Discipline Jon Michael Spencer In an essay in this issue originally published in a theological journal, ethnomusicologist Philip Bohlman raised a theomusicological ques­ tion that derived, appropriately enough, from his attempt to delimit common interests between ethnomusicology and theology. The pre­ eminent question was not "Is All Music Religious? '-the title of his common ethnomusicological language brief article. It was, "Is there a about music and religion that forms into a more explicit discourse? And to what extent do music and religion manifest themselves as common elements-indeed, as shared vocabulary-in the discourse and endeavors of the entire discipline of ethnomusicology?"l In answer to Bohlman's question, ethnomusicologists generally only stumble onto the realization that music and religion can develop a common vocabulary and explicit discourse, since they rarely have an interest in theology or in the history of religions as Bohlman seems to have. This was demonstrated at the ethnomusi­ cology conference Bohlman held in the mid-198os at Cornell Uni­ versity on the theme "Popular Music in the Middle East, South Asia, and Southeast Asia." At the conclusion of the conference, ethnomu­ sicologist Bruno Nettl, who was to connect the disparate presenta­ tions into some http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Black Sacred Music Duke University Press

Musicology as a Theologically Informed Discipline

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Copyright
Copyright © 1994 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1043-9455
eISSN
2640-9879
DOI
10.1215/10439455-8.1.36
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Musicology as a Theologically Informed Discipline Jon Michael Spencer In an essay in this issue originally published in a theological journal, ethnomusicologist Philip Bohlman raised a theomusicological ques­ tion that derived, appropriately enough, from his attempt to delimit common interests between ethnomusicology and theology. The pre­ eminent question was not "Is All Music Religious? '-the title of his common ethnomusicological language brief article. It was, "Is there a about music and religion that forms into a more explicit discourse? And to what extent do music and religion manifest themselves as common elements-indeed, as shared vocabulary-in the discourse and endeavors of the entire discipline of ethnomusicology?"l In answer to Bohlman's question, ethnomusicologists generally only stumble onto the realization that music and religion can develop a common vocabulary and explicit discourse, since they rarely have an interest in theology or in the history of religions as Bohlman seems to have. This was demonstrated at the ethnomusi­ cology conference Bohlman held in the mid-198os at Cornell Uni­ versity on the theme "Popular Music in the Middle East, South Asia, and Southeast Asia." At the conclusion of the conference, ethnomu­ sicologist Bruno Nettl, who was to connect the disparate presenta­ tions into some

Journal

Black Sacred MusicDuke University Press

Published: Mar 1, 1994

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