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Musical Representations, Subjects, and Objects: The Construction of Musical Thought in Zarlino, Descartes, Rameau, and Weber

Musical Representations, Subjects, and Objects: The Construction of Musical Thought in Zarlino,... cauldian history that the four theorists under consideration are partly chosen along very traditional lines, following patterns of influence and lines of tradition: Zarlino’s teachings set the standards for Descartes, who was crucial for Rameau’s age, whose theory was the major model for Weber’s generation. But one among these four theorists stands out: where Zarlino, Rameau and Weber have earned their place in the musictheoretical canon, Descartes’ youthful treatise has had very little impact in the field of music theory (not least because although it was written as early as 1618, it was not published until 1650). Yet Descartes’ name resonates more strongly with the concepts of epistemology and ontology that are so central to the concerns of this book. For only a few years later, Descartes would subject the latter to the former, in his three momentous Latin words: cogito ergo sum. For Moreno, the impact of this music-theoretical Descartes can be summed up in four other Latin words that he cites throughout the book in constantly varying translations: huius objectum est sonus. Moreno’s story begins with the question of order in the age of Zarlino, under the regime of the Renaissance episteme. Zarlino’s work has a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Music Theory Duke University Press

Musical Representations, Subjects, and Objects: The Construction of Musical Thought in Zarlino, Descartes, Rameau, and Weber

Journal of Music Theory , Volume 47 (2) – Jan 1, 2003

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2003 by Yale University
ISSN
0022-2909
eISSN
1941-7497
DOI
10.1215/00222909-47-2-363
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

cauldian history that the four theorists under consideration are partly chosen along very traditional lines, following patterns of influence and lines of tradition: Zarlino’s teachings set the standards for Descartes, who was crucial for Rameau’s age, whose theory was the major model for Weber’s generation. But one among these four theorists stands out: where Zarlino, Rameau and Weber have earned their place in the musictheoretical canon, Descartes’ youthful treatise has had very little impact in the field of music theory (not least because although it was written as early as 1618, it was not published until 1650). Yet Descartes’ name resonates more strongly with the concepts of epistemology and ontology that are so central to the concerns of this book. For only a few years later, Descartes would subject the latter to the former, in his three momentous Latin words: cogito ergo sum. For Moreno, the impact of this music-theoretical Descartes can be summed up in four other Latin words that he cites throughout the book in constantly varying translations: huius objectum est sonus. Moreno’s story begins with the question of order in the age of Zarlino, under the regime of the Renaissance episteme. Zarlino’s work has a

Journal

Journal of Music TheoryDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2003

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